Journal of Urban Health

, Volume 87, Issue 1, pp 113–121

Sexual Partnering and HIV Risk among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men: New York City

  • Hong-Van Tieu
  • Christopher Murrill
  • Guozhen Xu
  • Beryl A. Koblin
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11524-009-9416-x

Cite this article as:
Tieu, HV., Murrill, C., Xu, G. et al. J Urban Health (2010) 87: 113. doi:10.1007/s11524-009-9416-x

Abstract

Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected with HIV in the US. Limited event-specific data have been reported in Black MSM to help understand factors associated with increased risk of infection. Cross-sectional National HIV Behavioral Surveillance Study data from 503 MSM who reported ≥1 male sexual partner in the past year in New York City (NYC) were analyzed. Case-crossover analysis compared last protected and last unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). A total of 503 MSM were enrolled. Among 349 tested for HIV, 18% were positive. Black MSM (N = 117) were more likely to test HIV positive and not know their HIV-positive status than other racial/ethnic groups. Case-crossover analysis of 208 MSM found that men were more likely to engage in protected anal intercourse with a first time partner and with a partner of unknown HIV status. Although Black MSM were more likely to have Black male partners, they were not more likely to have UAI with those partners or to have a partner aged >40 years. In conclusion, HIV prevalence was high among Black MSM in NYC, as was lack of awareness of HIV-positive status. Having a sexual partner of same race/ethnicity or older age was not associated with having UAI among Black MSM.

Keywords

HIV infection Sexual partnering Black men who have sex with men African American Unprotected anal intercourse 

Copyright information

© The New York Academy of Medicine 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hong-Van Tieu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher Murrill
    • 3
  • Guozhen Xu
    • 1
  • Beryl A. Koblin
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Infectious Disease PreventionLindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of MedicineColumbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.New York City Department of Health and Mental HygieneNew YorkUSA

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