Journal of Urban Health

, Volume 86, Issue 4, pp 654–664

Health of the Homeless and Climate Change

Article

Abstract

The homeless are amongst the most vulnerable groups in developed regions, suffering from high rates of poorly controlled chronic disease, smoking, respiratory conditions, and mental illness, all of which render them vulnerable to new and resurgent disease processes associated with climate change. To date, there have been no papers reviewing the impacts of climate change on the homeless population. This paper provides a framework for understanding the nature of such an impact. We review four pathways: increased heat waves, increased air pollution, increased severity of floods and storms, and the changing distribution of West Nile Virus. We emphasize the need for further debate and research in this field.

Keywords

Climate change Homeless health Health impacts of climate change 

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Copyright information

© The New York Academy of Medicine 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Toronto (BR, TS)TorontoCanada
  2. 2.Centre for Research on Inner City HealthSt. Michael’s HospitalTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Centre for Research on Inner City HealthSt. Michael’s HospitalTorontoCanada

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