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Frontiers of Education in China

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 339–363 | Cite as

Will Globalized Higher Education Embrace Diversity in China?

  • Yan WangEmail author
  • Sao Leng Ieong
Research Article
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

China’s reform and opening up policy has not only freed the country to become a global economic giant but also tuned its higher education in with international trends. This study examines how internationalization has impacted core university values and whether or not this newly globalized higher education will embrace diversity so that Chinese cultural and scholarly traditions are given space to develop. Adopting notions of diversity and “dialogue among civilizations” as the conceptual framework, this study finds that, rather than nurturing a genuine meaningful sense of intellectual openness and plurality, globalized higher education in China has tended to foster countervailing tendencies of conformity and homogeneity with Western models, and the historical dilemma of integrating Western perspectives with Chinese indigenous ideas is not yet being resolved.

Keywords

globalization internationalization of higher education diversity homogeneity university mission 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of MacauMacau SARChina

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