Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 244–248

WIN55,212-2 Inhibits Production of CX3CL1 by Human Astrocytes: Involvement of p38 MAP Kinase

  • W. S. Sheng
  • S. Hu
  • H. T. Ni
  • R. B. Rock
  • P. K. Peterson
Brief Report

Abstract

CX3CL1 (fractalkine) has been shown not only to be neuroprotective but also may play a role in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis. In this study, we found that production of CX3CL1 by human astrocytes stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1β was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner following pretreatment with the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2. The CB2 receptor selective antagonist SR144528 significantly inhibited WIN55,212-2-mediated suppression of CX3CL1, suggesting a CB2-receptor-related mechanism. IL-1β triggered the activation of p38 and ERK1/2 (p44/42) MAP kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, but WIN55,212-2 mainly inhibited p38 MAPK phosphorylation. This finding was mirrored in experiments using known inhibitors of these MAPKs, suggesting that the suppression of CX3CL1 production by WIN55,212-2 involves inhibition of signaling via p38 MAPK. Our results support the concept that synthetic cannabinoids have anti-inflammatory properties and that these agents may have therapeutic potential for certain neuroinflammatory disorders.

Keywords

astrocytes CX3CL1 MAP kinase 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. S. Sheng
    • 1
  • S. Hu
    • 1
  • H. T. Ni
    • 2
  • R. B. Rock
    • 1
  • P. K. Peterson
    • 1
  1. 1.The Center for Infectious Diseases & Microbiology Translational Research, Department of MedicineUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.R&D Systems, Inc.MinneapolisUSA

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