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Plasmonics

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 407–413 | Cite as

Au/Ag Bimetallic Nanocomposites as a Highly Sensitive Plasmonic Material

  • Taerin Chung
  • Charles Soon Hong Hwang
  • Myeong-Su Ahn
  • Ki-Hun JeongEmail author
Article
  • 219 Downloads

Abstract

We report Au/Ag bimetallic nanocomposites as a highly sensitive plasmonic material. A unit approach via a three-dimensional numerical modeling is introduced to observe collective plasmon resonance in Au/Ag bimetallic nanocomposites as well as Au mono-metallic nanoensembles. Au nanoensembles provide consistently identical plasmon wavelength, independent of inter-unit distance. In analogy with mono-metallic nanoensembles, Au/Ag bimetallic nanocomposites distinctly feature converging dual plasmon resonance peaks to a single plasmon resonance peak, strongly depending on the packing density and the unit size. An effective unit size of bimetallic nanocomposites is below 2.5 nm in a subwavelength structure, which is small enough to feature bimetallic nanocomposites. As a result, the Au/Ag bimetallic nanocomposites clearly show exceptionally high sensitivity and figure-of-merit (approximately 3-fold of conventional plasmon sensitivity and 4.3-fold of conventional plasmon FOM), resulting from coupled Au-Ag quadrupole bimetallic nanounits. This study provides essential rationales for Au/Ag bimetallic nanocomposites serving as a desirable and alternative plasmonic material for advanced nanoplasmonic-sensing technologies.

Keywords

Nanomaterials Plasmon sensitivity Bimetallic nanocomposites Metallic nanoalloy 

Notes

Funding

This work was supported by Samsung Research Funding Center of Samsung Electronics under Project Number SRFC-IT1402-51 and National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning under Project Number 2018029899.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Bio and Brain engineering and KAIST Institute for Health Science and TechnologyKorea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)DaejeonRepublic of Korea

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