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Plasmonics

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 1631–1637 | Cite as

Simple Closed Formulae for the Number of the Short-Range Surface-Plasma Wave Guided by a Thin, Plane Metallic Film, Between Claddings with Unequal Permittivities

  • Denis Jaisson
Article
  • 41 Downloads

Abstract

Closed formulae are derived for the wave number of a short-range surface-plasma wave guided by a metallic film between two thick dielectric slabs. The respective permittivities of those claddings may differ from each other, as much as those of air and silicon carbide do for example. The new formulae are simpler and more accurate than the formulae published previously. Contrary to the latter, they are not limited in the range of the film’s thickness, as is illustrated by two examples.

Keywords

Short-range surface plasmon polariton SRSPP Surface wave Plasma wave Thin film Negative permittivity Photovoltaic solar cell Biological sensor Integrated photonics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author is grateful to the group of Professor Raschke, for making measurements performed on gold samples at the Physics Department of Colorado University at Boulder, available in a data depository.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ParisFrance

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