Plasmonics

, 3:151 | Cite as

Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Tapered Fiber Optic Sensor: Sensitivity Enhancement by Introducing a Teflon Layer Between Core and Metal Layer

Article

Abstract

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based tapered fiber optic sensor with Teflon as a dielectric sandwiched between metal and tapered fiber core is proposed. The sensitivity of the sensor has been maximized using different combinations of metal and Teflon layer thicknesses for a given taper ratio. The study shows that the sensitivity of the sensor with the introduction of dielectric (Teflon) increases with the increase in the taper ratio. The maximum sensitivity achieved for a given taper ratio is around 15 times higher than the general SPR-based fiber optic sensor.

Keywords

Evanescent wave Optical fiber Sensitivity Surface plasmon resonance Tapered fiber 

Notes

Acknowledgement

One of the authors, R.K. Verma, is thankful to CSIR (India) for providing Junior Research Fellowship (JRF). The present work is partially supported by CSIR Grant 3(1025)/05/EMR-II.

References

  1. 1.
    Liedberg B, Nylander C, Sundstrom I (1983) Surface plasmon resonance for gas detection and biosensing. Sens Actuators 4:299–304CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jorgenson RC, Yee SS (1993) A fiber-optic chemical sensor based on surface plasmon resonance. Sens Actuators B 12:213–220CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rajan, Chand S, Gupta BD (2006) Fabrication and characterization of a surface plasmon resonance based fiber-optic sensor for bittering component—Naringin. Sens Actuators B 115:344–348CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wang TJ, Tu CW, Liu FK, Chen HL (2004) Surface plasmon resonance waveguide biosensor by bipolarization wavelength interrogation. Phot Tech Lett 16:1715–1717CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rajan, Chand S, Gupta BD (2007) Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor for the detection of pesticide. Sens Actuators B 123:661–666CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Nenninger GG, Tobiska P, Homola J, Yee SS (2001) Long range surface plasmons for high resolution surface plasmon resonance sensors. Sens Actuators B 74:145–151CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sarid D (1981) Long range surface plasma waves on very thin metal films. Phys Rev Let 47:1927–1931CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Burke JJ, Stegeman GI, Tamir T (1986) Surface polaritons like waves guided by thin, lossy metal film. Phys Rev B 33:5186–5200CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Verma RK, Sharma AK, Gupta BD (2007) Modeling of tapered fiber optic surface plasmon resonance sensor with enhanced sensitivity. Phot Tech Lett 19:1786–1788CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ghatak AK, Thyagarajan K (1999) Introduction to fiber optics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p 85Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Lowry JH, Mendlowitz JS, Subramanian NS (1992) Optical characteristics of Teflon AF fluroplastic materials. Opt Eng 31:1982–1984CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Sharma AK, Gupta BD (2007) On the performance of different bimetallic combinations in surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensors. J Appl Phys 101:093111CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ankiewicz A, Pask C, Snyder AW (1982) Slowly varying optical fibers. J Opt Soc Amer 72:198–203CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Physics DepartmentIndian Institute of Technology DelhiNew DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations