Frontiers of Philosophy in China

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 57–74 | Cite as

Original mind and cosmic consciousness in the co-creative process

Research Article

Abstract

This article will investigate the issue of accessing benxin 本心 (original mind), subsequent operation from Self and, in that process, union with the “greater universe” or benti 本体 (original substance)—a state expressed in the West as “cosmic consciousness.” It is proposed that this allows one to participate as a partner in the creative process of one’s own life and the surrounding world. The equally important question of how to gain contact with original mind will also be addressed, as well as the consequences of doing so with regard to the human condition. The concept of original thought is introduced, being important here as it is held to be that thought which is generated in the pure condition of original mind, devoid of influence from finite physical existence.

Keywords

cosmic consciousness original mind original substance original thought Greater self 

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sino-Brazilian Academic Exchange CenterBeijingChina

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