Journal of Maritime Archaeology

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 17–35 | Cite as

South Carolina Shipyards: Labour, Logistics, Lumber and Ladies

Original Paper

Abstract

Southern shipyards, like Hobcaw and Mars Bluff, were established at locations chosen primarily for convenient access to transportation networks, building materials, clientele and labour. The historical record reveals a home front role played by local plantation owners and slaves as shipyard labour. Women served as project fundraisers, shipyard dilettantes, shipwright’s wives and possibly slave mistresses with a paucity of material culture to confirm their presence in the archaeological record. Archaeological investigations on land and underwater yield evidence of artefacts associated with diet, shipbuilding, warfare and ethnicity.

Keywords

Shipyards South Carolina Slaves Women Confederate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Program in Maritime StudiesEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA

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