Journal of Maritime Archaeology

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 21–49 | Cite as

‘The Social’ and Beyond: Introducing Actor-Network Theory

Original Paper

Abstract

In recent years, it has been suggested (e.g. TAG 2002, 2006; IKUWA3 2008) that it is necessary for the discipline to move beyond the study of ships and boats towards the ‘wider social contexts’ of seafaring and maritime activity. This paper investigates the contours of ‘social’ as an object of study. Two questions are asked: (1) how is this object defined within sociology, classical and contemporary social theory, and archaeology; and (2) what is the status of nonhumans, physical-material things, artefacts, plants, animals, etc.? After taking a look at several different theories, it is argued that it is not necessary for us to move beyond ships and boats. Instead, an alternative approach is offered, one that allows us to move beyond the restrictive ontology of the social.

Keywords

Social Agency Hybrids Objects Ambivalence Actor-networks 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Maritime ArchaeologyUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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