Journal of Geographical Sciences

, Volume 28, Issue 5, pp 547–562 | Cite as

Spatiotemporal patterns and characteristics of land-use change in China during 2010–2015

  • Jia Ning
  • Jiyuan Liu
  • Wenhui Kuang
  • Xinliang Xu
  • Shuwen Zhang
  • Changzhen Yan
  • Rendong Li
  • Shixin Wu
  • Yunfeng Hu
  • Guoming Du
  • Wenfeng Chi
  • Tao Pan
  • Jing Ning
Article
  • 43 Downloads

Abstract

Land use/cover change is an important theme on the impacts of human activities on the earth systems and global environmental change. National land-use changes of China during 2010–2015 were acquired by the digital interpretation method using the high-resolution remotely sensed images, e.g. the Landsat 8 OLI, GF-2 remote sensing images. The spatiotemporal characteristics of land-use changes across China during 2010–2015 were revealed by the indexes of dynamic degree model, annual land-use changes ratio etc. The results indicated that the built-up land increased by 24.6×103 km2 while the cropland decreased by 4.9×103 km2, and the total area of woodland and grassland decreased by 16.4×103 km2. The spatial pattern of land-use changes in China during 2010–2015 was concordant with that of the period 2000–2010. Specially, new characteristics of land-use changes emerged in different regions of China in 2010–2015. The built-up land in eastern China expanded continually, and the total area of cropland decreased, both at decreasing rates. The rates of built-up land expansion and cropland shrinkage were accelerated in central China. The rates of built-up land expansion and cropland growth increased in western China, while the decreasing rate of woodland and grassland accelerated. In northeastern China, built-up land expansion slowed continually, and cropland area increased slightly accompanied by the conversions between paddy land and dry land. Besides, woodland and grassland area decreased in northeastern China. The characteristics of land-use changes in eastern China were essentially consistent with the spatial govern and control requirements of the optimal development zones and key development zones according to the Major Function-oriented Zones Planning implemented during the 12th Five-Year Plan (2011–2015). It was a serious challenge for the central government of China to effectively protect the reasonable layout of land use types dominated with the key ecological function zones and agricultural production zones in central and western China. Furthermore, the local governments should take effective measures to strengthen the management of territorial development in future.

Keywords

land-use change spatial-temporal characteristics remote sensing Major Function-oriented Zones China 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Geographic Science and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Science China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jia Ning
    • 1
  • Jiyuan Liu
    • 1
  • Wenhui Kuang
    • 1
  • Xinliang Xu
    • 1
  • Shuwen Zhang
    • 2
  • Changzhen Yan
    • 3
  • Rendong Li
    • 4
  • Shixin Wu
    • 5
  • Yunfeng Hu
    • 1
  • Guoming Du
    • 6
  • Wenfeng Chi
    • 1
  • Tao Pan
    • 5
  • Jing Ning
    • 6
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Land Surface Pattern and Simulation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources ResearchCASBeijingChina
  2. 2.Northeast Institute of Geography and AgroecologyCASChangchunChina
  3. 3.Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research InstituteCASLanzhouChina
  4. 4.Institute of Geodesy and GeophysicsCASWuhanChina
  5. 5.Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and GeographyCASUrumqiChina
  6. 6.Northeast Agricultural UniversityHarbinChina

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