Journal of Geographical Sciences

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 135–149 | Cite as

Analysis of vegetation response to rainfall with satellite images in Dongting Lake

  • Weiguo Jiang
  • Peng Hou
  • Xiaohua Zhu
  • Guangzhen Cao
  • Xiaoman Liu
  • Ruyin Cao
Article

Abstract

We analyzed the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from satellite images and precipitation data from meteorological stations from 1998 to 2007 in the Dongting Lake wetland watershed to better understand the eco-hydrological effect of atmospheric precipitation and its relationship with vegetation. First, we analyzed its general spatio-temporal distribution using its mean, standard deviation and linear trend. Then, we used the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) method to decompose the NDVI and precipitation data into spatial and temporal modes. We selected four leading modes based on North and Scree test rules and analyzed the synchronous seasonal and inter-annual variability between the vegetation index and precipitation, distinguishing time-lagged correlations between EOF modes with the correlative degree analysis method. According to our detailed analyses, the vegetation index and precipitation exhibit a prominent correlation in spatial distribution and seasonal variation. At the 90% confidence level, the time lag is around 110 to 140 days, which matches well with the seasonal variation.

Keywords

eco-hydrology precipitation vegetation remote sensing wetland Dongting Lake 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Weiguo Jiang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peng Hou
    • 1
    • 3
  • Xiaohua Zhu
    • 4
  • Guangzhen Cao
    • 5
  • Xiaoman Liu
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ruyin Cao
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Earth Process and Resource EcologyBeijing Normal UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.Academy of Disaster Reduction and Emergency ManagementBeijing Normal UniversityBeijingChina
  3. 3.Satellite Environment CenterMEPBeijingChina
  4. 4.Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources ResearchCASBeijingChina
  5. 5.Key Laboratory of Radiometric Calibration and Validation for Environmental SatellitesChina Meteorological AdministrationBeijingChina

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