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Acta Geotechnica

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 57–70 | Cite as

Statistical assessment of load model accuracy for steel grid-reinforced soil walls

  • Yoshihisa Miyata
  • Richard J. BathurstEmail author
Research Paper

Abstract

The focus of this paper is on quantitative evaluation of four different methods that use closed-form equations to calculate the nominal load in steel grid-reinforced soil walls under operational (end of construction) conditions. The four methods are the Coherent Gravity Method used in the UK, the AASHTO Simplified Method (USA), the PWRC Method used in Japan and the Simplified Stiffness Method. The accuracy of the methods is quantified based on analysis of bias statistics where bias is the ratio of measured to predicted (nominal) load. A large database of 113 measured reinforcement loads collected from 11 instrumented field walls is used in the study. For walls constructed with frictional soils, the Coherent Gravity Method and PWRC Method were the least accurate. The AASHTO Simplified Method demonstrated better accuracy and the Simplified Stiffness Method was the most accurate of all methods examined. The Coherent Gravity Method and the updated Simplified Stiffness Method for steel grid walls in the current study have the advantage that they can be used with soils that have a dependable soil cohesive strength component. However, the accuracy of the Simplified Stiffness Method was much better for all soil types based on bias analyses.

Keywords

Coherent Gravity Method Load models Mechanically stabilized earth Reinforced soil walls Simplified Method Simplified Stiffness Method Statistical analysis Steel grid 

Abbreviations

AASHTO

American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials (USA)

BSI

British Standards Institution

MSE

Mechanically stabilized earth

PWRC

Public Works Research Center (Japan)

Notes

Acknowledgements

The first author is grateful for funding awarded by the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology [Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) No. 17H03309] and the Scholarship and Education Foundation of the National Defense Academy of Japan to carry out this study including support for the second author to work on this project while in Japan. The authors wish to thank Mr. K. Terao for permission to use unpublished data from Geosystem Corporation.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringNational Defense AcademyYokosukaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Civil Engineering, GeoEngineering Centre at Queen’s-RMCRoyal Military College of CanadaKingstonCanada

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