Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 107–114 | Cite as

Meiyu in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River since 1736

  • Ge QuanSheng 
  • Guo XiFeng 
  • Zheng JingYun 
  • Hao ZhiXin 
Articles Geography

Abstract

“Yu Xue Fen Cun” records during the Qing Dynasty are used to identify the starting and ending dates of Meiyu at the period of 1736–1911. These results, along with the instrumental meteorological records, are used to reconstruct the series of length and precipitation of Meiyu during 1736–2000 over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River. The characteristics of Meiyu are analyzed since 1736. Moreover, the strength of East Asian Summer Monsoon and locations of rainband are discussed, based on the relationship between the length of Meiyu and the Index of East Asian Summer Monsoon. It is found that the starting and ending dates and the length of Meiyu have significant interannual and interdecadal variations. Apart from 7–8 years, 20–30 years and 40 years cycles for the lengths of Meiyu, the centennial oscillation is also presented. The length of Meiyu, monsoon rainband movement over eastern China, and the strength of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) have a very good correlation, which can be expressed in the following: during the periods of 1736–1770, 1821–1870 and 1921–1970, the EASM was stronger, and the monsoon rainband was located in North China and South China easily, corresponding to the decreased length of Meiyu. Whereas during the periods of 1771–1820, 1871–1920 and 1971–2000, the EASM was weaker and monsoon rainband usually stopped at the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, corresponding to the increased length of Meiyu.

Keywords

“Yu Xue Fen Cun” records reconstruction past 300 years variation of Meiyu middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ding Y H. Monsoons over China. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1994Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Zhou Z K. Meiyu over the Yangtze-Huaihe River Basin (in Chinese). Beijing: China Meteorological Press, 1996Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Chu K C. The enigma of Southeast Monsoon in China. Acta Geogr Sin (in Chinese), 1934, 1(1): 1–27Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Xu Q, Yang Y W, Yang Q M. The Meiyu in middle-lower reaches of Yangtze River during 116 recent years (I). In: Liu Z C, ed. Torrential Rain Disaster (IV) (in Chinese). Beijing: China Meteorological Press, 2001. 44–53Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Yang Y W, Xu Q, Yang Q M. The Meiyu in middle-lower reaches of Yangtze River during 116 recent years (II). In: Liu Z C, ed. Torrential Rain Disaster (IV) (in Chinese). Beijing: China Meteorological Press, 2001. 54–65Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Zhang D E, Wang P K. A study on Meiyu activity of eighteenth century in the lower Yangtze Region. Sci Chin Ser B, 1991, 34: 1237–1245Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Jiang T, Zhang Q, Blender R, et al. Yangtze Delta floods and droughts of the last millennium: Abrupt changes and long term memory. Theor Appl Climatol, 2005, 82: 131–141CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ge Q S, Zheng J Y, Hao Z X, et al. Reconstruction of historical climate in China: High-resolution precipitation data from Qing Dynasty archives. Bull Amer Meteor Soc, 2005, 86: 671–679CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    China Institute of Water Rresources and Hydropower Research. Drought and Flood Documents for the River during Qing Dynasty—Drought and Flood Archives in the Yangtze River and Southwest International Rivers (in Chinese). Beijing: Zhong Hua Book Co, 1991Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research. Drought and Flood Archives for the Huaihe River (in Chinese). Beijing: Zhong Hua Book Co, 1993Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research. Drought and Flood Archives for the River over Zhejiang, Fujian and Taiwan regions (in Chinese). Beijing: Zhong Hua Book Co, 1998Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Lin C Y. Several questions on the Meiyu discussions. Meteorology (in Chinese), 1981, 7(7): 12–14Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Lin Z G. Advance and retreat regulations of the summer monsoon rain belt in East China. In: Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, ed. The No.5 Collected Papers on Meteorological Science and Technology (in Chinese). Beijing: China Meteorological Press, 1987. 24–31Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Chen J Y. Analysis on droughts and floods in China and research on long-term forecast (in Chinese). Beijing: Agricultural Press, 1991Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Duan Y W, Xu M Y. The starting and ending of rain season in Eastern China. In: Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, ed. Geographic Collection, No.11: Long-term Weather Forecast (in Chinese). Beijing: Sciences Press, 1979. 40–49Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Guo Q Y, Cai J N, Shao X M, et al. Studies on the variations of East Asian Summer Monsoon during AD1873-2000. Chin J Atmo Sci (in Chinese), 2004, 28: 206–215Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Wang S W, Huang J B. The variations of geographical latitude of rain belts in summer over Eastern China during the last millennium. Adv Climate Change Res (in Chinese), 2006, 2(3): 117–121Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Wang H J. The weakening of the Asian monsoon circulation after the end of 1970s. Adv Atmos Sci, 2001, 18(3): 376–386CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ge QuanSheng 
    • 1
  • Guo XiFeng 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zheng JingYun 
    • 1
  • Hao ZhiXin 
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources ResearchChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Graduate University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

Personalised recommendations