Quantum efficiency and temperature coefficients of GaInP/GaAs dual-junction solar cell

  • Lei Liu
  • NuoFu Chen
  • YiMing Bai
  • Ming Cui
  • Han Zhang
  • FuBao Gao
  • ZhiGang Yin
  • XingWang Zhang
Article

Abstract

GaInP/GaAs dual-junction solar cell with a conversion efficiency of 25.2% has been fabricated using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. Quantum efficiencies of the solar cell were measured within a temperature range from 25 to 160°C. The results indicate that the quantum efficiencies of the subcells increase slightly with the increasing temperature. And red-shift phenomena of absorption limit for all subcells are observed by increasing the cell’s work temperature, which are consistent with the viewpoint of energy gap narrowing effect. The short-circuit current density temperature coefficients dJ sc/dT of GaInP subcell and GaAs subcell are determined to be 8.9 and 7.4 μA/cm2/°C from the quantum efficiency data, respectively. And the open-circuit cell voltage temperature coefficients dV oc/dT calculated based on a theoretical equation are −2.4 mV/°C and −2.1 mV/°C for GaInP subcell and GaAs subcell.

Keywords

quantum efficiency temperature coefficient solar cell 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lei Liu
    • 1
  • NuoFu Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • YiMing Bai
    • 1
  • Ming Cui
    • 1
  • Han Zhang
    • 1
  • FuBao Gao
    • 1
  • ZhiGang Yin
    • 1
  • XingWang Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of SemiconductorsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.National Laboratory of Microgravity, Institute of MechanicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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