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Science China Earth Sciences

, Volume 59, Issue 2, pp 362–370 | Cite as

The effect of volatile components in oil on evolutionary characteristics of diamondoids during oil thermal pyrolysis

  • ChenChen Fang
  • YongQiang XiongEmail author
  • Yun Li
  • QianYong Liang
  • TongShan Wang
  • YongXin Li
Research Paper
  • 76 Downloads

Abstract

On the basis of the results of simulation experiments, now we better understand the contribution of high carbon number hydrocarbons to diamondoid generation during thermal pyrolysis of crude oil and its sub-fractions (saturated, aromatic, resin, and asphalene fractions). However, little is known about the effect of volatile components in oil on diamondoid generation and diamondoid indices due to the lack of attention to these components in experiments. In this study, the effect of volatile components in oil on diamondoid generation and maturity indices was investigated by the pyrolysis simulation experiments on a normal crude oil from the HD23 well of the Tarim Basin and its residual oil after artificial volatilization, combined with quantitative analysis of diamondoids. The results indicate that the volatile components (≤nC12) in oil have an obvious contribution to the generation of adamantanes, which occurs mainly in the early stage of oil cracking (EasyR o<1.0%), and influences the variations in maturity indices of adamantanes; but they have no obvious effect on the generation and maturity indices of diamantanes. Therefore, some secondary alterations e.g., migration, gas washing, and biodegradation, which may result in the loss of light hydrocarbons in oil under actual geological conditions, could affect the identification of adamantanes generated during the late-stage cracking of crude oil, and further influence the practical application of adamantane indices.

Keywords

crude oil volatile component thermal pyrolysis diamondoids evolution characteristics 

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Copyright information

© Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • ChenChen Fang
    • 1
    • 2
  • YongQiang Xiong
    • 2
    Email author
  • Yun Li
    • 2
  • QianYong Liang
    • 3
  • TongShan Wang
    • 1
  • YongXin Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and DevelopmentBeijingChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of GeochemistryChinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhouChina
  3. 3.Guangzhou Marine Geological SurveyMinistry of Land and ResourceGuangzhouChina

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