Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences

, Volume 50, Issue 6, pp 936–945 | Cite as

Regional difference of annual precipitation and discharge variation over west China during the last 50 years

Article

Abstract

Using annual precipitation and discharge data measured in the past five decades, this paper analyzed the regional differences over west China in terms of climate and discharge variations, and investigated the relationship between the regional characteristics and the activities of South and East Asian summer monsoon. Results revealed that the precipitation and discharge in the upper reaches of the Yellow River (Central West China) have a negative correlation with those in Xinjiang (northwest China) and the Yarlung Zangbo River (the upper reaches of the Brahmaputra Rive, southwest China) regions. The geographical patterns of precipitation and discharge variations are different over west China, i.e. the regional climate displays the alteration of dry-wet-dry or wet-dry-wet from north to south in west China. The negative correlation of annual discharges between Xinjiang and the upper reaches of the Yellow River is found statistically significant in the decadal scale, and that between the Yarlung Zangbo River and the upper reaches of the Yellow River is found active in the interannual scale. The regional characteristics indicate that the discharge/precipitation variations in the upper reaches of the Yellow River are dominated by the East Asian summer monsoon while their variations in Xinjiang are affected by both the west wind and East Asian summer monsoon.

Keywords

annual discharge variation Asian monsoon West China precipitation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Jones P D, Hulme, M. Calculating regional climatic time series for temperature and precipitation: methods and illustrations. J Climatol, 1996, 16: 361–377CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hulme M, Osborn T J, Johns T C. Precipitation sensitivity to global warmin: Comparison of observation with HadCM2 simulation. Geophys Res Lett, 1998, 25: 3379–3382CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Doherty R M, Hulme M, Jones C G.. A gridded reconstruction of land and ocean precipitation for the extended Tropics from 1974–1994. Int J Climatol, 1999, 19: 119–142CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Karl T R, Knight R W. Secular trends of precipitation amount, frequency, and intensity in the USA. Bull Am Met Soc, 1998, 79: 231–241CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Labat D, Godderiset Y, Probst J, et al. Evidence for bloble runoff increse related to clilmate warming. Adv Water Resour, 2004, 27: 631–642CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Peterson B, Holmes R, McClelland J, et al. Increasing river discharge to the Arctic Ocean. Science, 2002, 298: 2171–2173CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ye B S, Li C, Yang D Q, Ding Y J, et al. The variation trend of precipitation in China during the last 50 years and its impacts on water resources for annual results. J Glaciol Geocryol (in Chinese), 2004, 26(5): 587–594Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Zhang G W, Wu S F, Wang Z J. The signal of climatic shift in Northwest China deduced from river runoff change in Xinjiang region. J Glaciol Geocryol (in Chinese), 2003, 25(2): 183–187Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Shi Y F, Shen Y P, Li D L, et al. An Assessment of the Issues Ofclimatic Shift From Warm-dry to Warm-wet in Northwest China (in Chinese). Beijing: Meteorological Press, 2003. 124Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cong L C, Zhang C J. Changing features of Precipitation over Northwest China During the 20th century. J Glaciol Geocryol (in Chinese), 2003, 25(2): 143–148Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Zhang C J, Gao X J, Zhao H Y. Impact if Global warming on Autumn Precipitation in Northwest China. J Glaciol Geocryol (in Chinese), 2003, 25(2): 135–148Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Ye B, Li C, Yang D Q, et al. The variation trend of precipitation in China during the last 50 years and its impacts on water resources for monthly results. J Glaciol Geocryol (in Chinese), 2004, 26(5): 587–594Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ye B S, Ding Y J, Kang E S. A response of the snow melt and glacier runoff to the climate warning-up in last 40 years in Xinjiang region. Sci China Ser D-Earth Sci, 1999, 42(Suppl.): 44–51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Yang Z. Glacier Water Resources in China (in Chinese). Lanzhou: Gansu Science and Technology Press, 1991. 13–44Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ye B, Yang D, Jiao K, et al. The Urumqi River Source Glacier No. 1, Tianshan, China: Changes over the Past 45. Geophys Res Lett, 2005, 32, L21504, doi:10.1029/2005GL024178.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Wang B, Wu R, Lau K M. Interannual Variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon: Contrasts between the Indian and the Western North Pacific-East Asian Monsoons. J Climate, 2001, (14): 4073–4090Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Wang K, Jiang H. Atmospheric water vapor transport from westerly and monsoon over the northwest China. In: Proceedings of the China Association for Science and Technology. Beijing/New York: Science Press, 2004. 1(1): 499–506Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Tang M C, Liang J, Shao M J, et al. Primary analysis of the annual variation of Tibet Plateau monsoon. Plateau Meteorology (in Chinese), 1984, 3(3): 76–82Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Wang N L. The boundary between the northern and southern Tibetan Plateau with different variations in the warm reason air temperatures on the decadal time scale. Quat Sci (in Chinese), 2006, 20(2): 165–172Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cold & Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute (CAREERI)Chinese Academy of SciencesLanzhouChina

Personalised recommendations