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Science in China Series D

, Volume 49, Issue 5, pp 531–538 | Cite as

Progress in technology for the 2005 height determination of Qomolangma Feng (Mt. Everest)

  • Chen Junyong 
  • Yuan Janli 
  • Guo Chunxi 
  • Zhang Yanping 
  • Zhang Peng 
Article

Abstract

In 2005 China carried out a new geodetic campaign for the height determination of Qomolangma Feng—Mt. Everest (QF in short). The technical progresses in geodesy for the 2005 campaign are presented in the paper. GPS positioning was the key technique in the campaign. After summarizing the experiences and lessons of the GPS positioning on the QF summit in the previous QF height determination campaigns, some measures were taken to raise the accuracy and reliability of the height determination with GPS techniques. In order to raise the accuracy of the height determination of the QF summit with classical geodetic techniques, laser ranging was used together with the trigonometric levelling in the 2005 campaign. It is the first time in China the thickness of the ice-snow layer on the QF summit was measured by ground penetrating radar integrated with GPS. The local gravity field and geoid in the QF area was improved on the basis of earth gravity field model integrated with new ground gravity data, DTM data and GPS leveling data in the QF area. In the 2005 campaign the normal height and orthometric height (height above sea level) of the snow surface of the QF summit were obtained as 8846.67 m and 8847.93 m respectively. The orthometric height of the rock surface of the QF summit is 8844.43 m, and the thickness of the ice-snow layer on the QF summit is 3.50 m.

Keywords

Qomolangma Feng Mt. Everest height determination GPS gravity field ground penetrating radar 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chen Junyong 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuan Janli 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guo Chunxi 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhang Yanping 
    • 1
  • Zhang Peng 
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Bureau of Surveying and MappingBeijingChina
  2. 2.School of Geodesy and GeomaticsWuhan UniversityWuhanChina

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