Science in China Series C: Life Sciences

, Volume 52, Issue 5, pp 407–411 | Cite as

Human avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infection in China

  • CuiLin Xu
  • LiBo Dong
  • Li Xin
  • Yu Lan
  • YongKun Chen
  • LiMei Yang
  • YueLong Shu
Special Topic Review

Abstract

Highly pathogenic influenza A (H5N1) virus causes a widespread poultry deaths worldwide. The first human H5N1 infected case was reported in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China in 1997. Since then, the virus re-emerged in 2003 and continues to infect people worldwide. Currently, over 400 human infections have been reported in more than 15 countries and mortality rate is greater than 60%. H5N1 viruses still pose a potential pandemic threat in the future because of the continuing global spread and evolution. Here, we summarize the epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of human H5N1 infection in China monitored and identified by our national surveillance systems.

Keywords

avian influenza H5N1 virus human infection China 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • CuiLin Xu
    • 1
  • LiBo Dong
    • 1
  • Li Xin
    • 1
  • Yu Lan
    • 1
  • YongKun Chen
    • 1
  • LiMei Yang
    • 1
  • YueLong Shu
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Viral Genetic and Engineering, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and PreventionChinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC)BeijingChina

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