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Science in China Series C: Life Sciences

, Volume 50, Issue 2, pp 186–193 | Cite as

Establishment of the diploid gynogenetic hybrid clonal line of red crucian carp × common carp

  • Liu ShaoJun Email author
  • Duan Wei 
  • Tao Min 
  • Zhang Chun 
  • Sun YuanDong 
  • Shen JiaMin 
  • Wang Jing 
  • Luo KaiKun 
  • Liu Yun 
Article

Abstract

This study investigated the gynogenetic cytobiological behavior of the third gynogenetic generation (G3), which was generated from the diploid eggs produced by the second gynogenetic generation (G2) of red crucian carp × common carp, and determined the chromosomal numbers of G3, G2×scatter scale carp and G2×allotetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp × common carp. The results showed that the diploid eggs of G2 with 100 chromosomes, activated by UV-irradiated sperm from scatter scale carp and without the treatment for doubling the chromosomes, could develop into G3 with 100 chromosomes. Similar to the first and second gynogenetic generations (G1 and G2), G3 was also diploid (2n=100) and presented the hybrid traits. The triploids (3n=150) and tetraploids (4n=200) were produced by crossing G2 with scatter scale carp, and crossing G2 with allotetraploids, respectively. The extrusion of the second polar body in the eggs of G2 ruled out the possibility that the retention of the second polar body led to the formation of the diploid eggs. In addition, we discussed the mechanism of the formation of the diploid eggs generated by G2. The establishment of the diploid gynogenesis clonal line (G1, G2 and G3) provided the evidence that the diploid eggs were able to develop into a new diploid hybrid clonal line by gynogenesis. By producing the diploid eggs as a unique reproductive way, the diploid gynogenetic progeny of allotetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp × common carp had important significances in both biological evolution and production application.

Keywords

gynogenesis diploid eggs chromosomes tetraploid 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liu ShaoJun 
    • 1
    Email author
  • Duan Wei 
    • 1
  • Tao Min 
    • 1
  • Zhang Chun 
    • 1
  • Sun YuanDong 
    • 1
  • Shen JiaMin 
    • 1
  • Wang Jing 
    • 1
  • Luo KaiKun 
    • 1
  • Liu Yun 
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Protein Chemistry and Fish Developmental Biology of Education Ministry of China, College of Life SciencesHunan Normal UniversityChangshaChina

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