What is shared? A framework for understanding shared innovation within communities

Research Article

Abstract

The twenty-first century economy often requires the innovative production of conceptual and physical artifacts. These innovations frequently are developed collaboratively within communities of workers. Previous theories about the nature of work and learning within communities have emphasized shared meaning or shared practice, but now shared innovation is required. In this paper, I describe the development of a model for conceptualizing and studying shared innovation within communities. This model was created from merging elements of social learning and creativity/innovation theories. I explain that at an intersection of these two domains is a unique kind of social structure, called a Community of Innovation, or COI. I conclude by describing the characteristics of a COI and its implications for design and research.

Keywords

Communities of practice Innovation Creativity Communities Collaboration Social learning theory Communities of innovation Information age Innovation economy Social learning 

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Copyright information

© Association for Educational Communications and Technology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Learning and Performance Support LaboratoryUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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