Forensic Toxicology

, Volume 31, Issue 2, pp 197–203 | Cite as

An LC–MS–MS method for quantitative analysis of six trimethoxyamphetamine designer drugs in rat plasma, and its application to a pharmacokinetic study

  • Maria Antonietta Pirisi
  • Maria Nieddu
  • Lucia Burrai
  • Antonio Carta
  • Irene Briguglio
  • Elena Baralla
  • Maria Piera Demontis
  • Maria Vittoria Varoni
  • Gianpiero Boatto
Original Article

Abstract

Trimethoxyamphetamines (TMAs) comprise a family of hallucinogenic drugs that includes various different positional isomers, which are important both for their hallucinogenic activity and their circulation in illicit drug markets. This report describes a method for identification and quantitation of six TMA isomers in rat plasma by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS–MS) with electrospray ionization. Mescaline-d 1 was used as internal standard. Multiple reaction monitoring on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in the positive ion mode was used for detection. The chromatographic system used a Varian Polaris C18-A column (2.0 × 100 mm i.d., 3 μm) and gradient elution with acetonitrile and 0.1 % formic acid in water. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range from 10 to 200 ng/ml for all drugs with correlation coefficients that exceeded 0.998. The limits of detection and quantitation ranged from 1.1 to 2.3 ng/ml and from 6.9 to 10.2 ng/ml, respectively. The validation data, such as precision, accuracy, and recovery, showed good reproducibility and selectivity. This method was successfully applied to evaluating the pharmacokinetic profiles of TMAs in rats.

Keywords

Trimethoxyamphetamines (TMAs) Designer drug LC–MS–MS Solid-phase extraction (SPE) Rat plasma Pharmacokinetic study 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Forensic Toxicology and Springer Japan 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Antonietta Pirisi
    • 1
  • Maria Nieddu
    • 1
  • Lucia Burrai
    • 1
  • Antonio Carta
    • 1
  • Irene Briguglio
    • 1
  • Elena Baralla
    • 2
  • Maria Piera Demontis
    • 2
  • Maria Vittoria Varoni
    • 2
  • Gianpiero Boatto
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Chimica e FarmaciaUniversità di SassariSassariItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Medicina VeterinariaUniversità di SassariSassariItaly

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