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Forensic Toxicology

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 199–201 | Cite as

A curious case of body packing: impaction of cocaine capsules in a colostomy exit

  • Benjamin M. Walter
  • M. Martignoni
  • J. Säckl
  • N. Felgenhauer
  • F. Eyer
  • V. Tratzl
  • R. M. Schmid
  • S. von Delius
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

Abdominal pain is a common symptom with a widespread bundle of possible causes from different medical disciplines. In some cases, foreign bodies are diagnosed as the reason for the complaints. In cities that are easily accessible by train or aeroplane, drug smuggling by body packing should be taken into consideration. Many different concealments have been previously described in the literature. In this short communication, we report an up-to-now unique case of body packing in a young man, who presented with an impaction of cocaine capsules in a colostomy space.

A 25-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital due to alcohol intoxication during Octoberfest. The abdomen was soft with regular bowel sounds and absence of localized tenderness. Noteworthy was the existence of a colostomy, which was created after a knife attack 3 years ago. The colostomy exit appeared scarred and in a bad state of care. Further physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory...

Keywords

Cocaine Foreign Body Ultrasonic Examination Body Packing Spontaneous Evacuation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Forensic Toxicology and Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin M. Walter
    • 1
  • M. Martignoni
    • 2
  • J. Säckl
    • 2
  • N. Felgenhauer
    • 3
  • F. Eyer
    • 3
  • V. Tratzl
    • 1
  • R. M. Schmid
    • 1
  • S. von Delius
    • 1
  1. 1.II. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, GastroenterologieKlinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University MunichMunichGermany
  2. 2.Chirurgische Klinik und PoliklinikKlinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University MunichMunichGermany
  3. 3.II. Medizinische Klinik, Toxikologische AbteilungKlinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University MunichMunichGermany

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