Journal of Natural Medicines

, Volume 68, Issue 4, pp 709–716 | Cite as

Structure of constituents isolated from the flower buds of Cananga odorata and their inhibitory effects on aldose reductase

  • Takahiro Matsumoto
  • Seikou Nakamura
  • Katsuyoshi Fujimoto
  • Tomoe Ohta
  • Keiko Ogawa
  • Masayuki Yoshikawa
  • Hisashi Matsuda
Note

Abstract

Three new terpenoid derivatives, canangaterpenes IV–VI, were isolated from the flower buds of Cananga odorata, cultivated in Thailand, together with eight known flavonoids. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on aldose reductase were also investigated. Several terpenoid derivatives and flavonoids were shown to inhibit aldose reductase.

Keywords

Cananga odorata Canangaterpene Aldose reductase Medicinal flower 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported in part by a Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)-Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, by a Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Pharmacognosy and Springer Japan 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takahiro Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Seikou Nakamura
    • 1
  • Katsuyoshi Fujimoto
    • 1
  • Tomoe Ohta
    • 1
  • Keiko Ogawa
    • 1
  • Masayuki Yoshikawa
    • 1
  • Hisashi Matsuda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacognosyKyoto Pharmaceutical UniversityKyotoJapan

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