Implementation of a Positive Development, Evidence-Supported Practice for Emerging Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions: The Transition to Independence Process (TIP) Model

  • Karyn Dresser
  • Hewitt B. Clark
  • Nicole Deschênes
Article

Abstract

Transition into adulthood represents a particularly challenging period for youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions and related needs. The Transition to Independence Process (TIP) model is based on a positive development approach and has been demonstrated to be an evidence-supported practice for preparing emerging adults in their movement into employment/career, education, living situation, personal effectiveness/well-being, and community-life functioning—and to be responsive to their families. This article describes the TIP model from a positive youth development framework, its empirical underpinnings, and the fidelity and outcome tracking tools that have been developed for use with transition sites for implementation and sustainability. A research study on the fidelity tools showed their reliability and validity and a second study presents progress and outcome findings for youth and young adults at a new TIP model site. The implications of the TIP model and these findings are discussed.

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Copyright information

© National Council for Behavioral Health 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karyn Dresser
    • 1
  • Hewitt B. Clark
    • 2
  • Nicole Deschênes
    • 3
  1. 1.Research and Program PracticesStars Behavioral Health GroupOaklandUSA
  2. 2.Child & Family Studies, MHC 2328, College of Behavioral and Community SciencesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.National Network on Youth Transition for Behavioral Health (NNYT)TampaUSA

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