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The Availability of Integrated Care in a National Sample of Therapeutic Communities

  • Meredith Huey DyeEmail author
  • Paul M. Roman
  • Hannah K. Knudsen
  • J. Aaron Johnson
Article

Abstract

Therapeutic communities (TCs) for substance abusers are oriented toward changing the entire person as a means for facilitating a drug-free future. This vision parallels ideas such as integrated care for the treatment of co-occurring substance abuse and psychiatric conditions. The extent to which integrated services are available in TCs has not been documented. Using data from a national sample of 345 TCs, this paper examines the availability of integrated care in TCs and the structural and cultural characteristics of TCs that offer integrated care. The results indicate that a substantial portion of TCs in this sample admit clients with co-occurring disorders (70.7%), and as many as half of the TCs offer integrated care. TCs that offer integrated care show increased use of professional staff, individual psychotherapy, and a less confrontational milieu, but notably, retain many of the “essential elements” of the traditional TC model.

Keywords

Substance Abuse Treatment Integrate Care Therapeutic Community Individual Psychotherapy Personal Recovery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge research support from Research Grant R01-DA-14976 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

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Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meredith Huey Dye
    • 1
    Email author
  • Paul M. Roman
    • 2
  • Hannah K. Knudsen
    • 3
  • J. Aaron Johnson
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Sociology/AnthropologyMiddle Tennessee State UniversityMurfreesboroUSA
  2. 2.Department of Sociology Center for Research on Behavioral Health and Human Services DeliveryUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  3. 3.Department of Behavioral ScienceUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Family MedicineMercer University School of Medicine and Medical Center of Central GeorgiaMaconUSA

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