Supportive Housing Approaches in the Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness (CICH)

  • Marilyn Kresky-Wolff
  • Mary Jo Larson
  • Robert W. O’Brien
  • Sarah A. McGraw
Article

Abstract

The Federal Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness funded 11 sites to expand permanent housing and offer supportive services to persons experiencing chronic homelessness and suffering from mental and substance use disorders. This study examines qualitative data on how the projects used US Department of Housing and Urban Development funding and three housing approaches (scattered units, congregate/clustered, or a combination) for rapid placement of clients. Each housing approach called for adaptations by the services teams and property personnel in order to support clients with independent living skills, prevent housing loss, and promote their overall health in line with Initiative goals. Property personnel reported taking on new roles with clients and forming new collaborative arrangements with services teams. The authors discuss the lessons reported by sites that were associated with housing configuration, type of lease, and role of property personnel.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Recognition and appreciation to the members of the Policy Group that developed the Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness: ICH: Philip F. Mangano and Mary Silveira; HHS: Walter Leginski, Jane Taylor, Michael J. English, Frances L. Randolph, Jean Hochron, and Lyman Van Nostrand; HUD: John Garrity, Mark Johnston, and Laura Hogshead; and VA: Pete Dougherty, Robert Rosenheck, and Al Taylor. Recognition and appreciation also to Megan Renfrew, Elizabeth Mason, and Emily Elstad of New England Research Institutes (NERI).

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Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn Kresky-Wolff
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary Jo Larson
    • 3
  • Robert W. O’Brien
    • 1
  • Sarah A. McGraw
    • 4
  1. 1.The CDM Group, Inc.BethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Open Arms Housing, IncWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.Schneider Institutes for Health Policy, The Heller SchoolBrandeis UniversityWalthamUSA
  4. 4.New England Research Institutes, IncWatertownUSA

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