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Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness: Introduction

  • Lawrence D. Rickards
  • Sarah A. McGrawEmail author
  • Lynnette Araki
  • Roger J. Casey
  • Cynthia W. High
  • Mary Ellen Hombs
  • Robyn S. Raysor
Article

Abstract

The Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness was a coordinated effort by the US Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Veterans Affairs (VA), and the US Interagency Council on Homelessness to house and provide comprehensive supportive services to individuals with serious psychiatric, substance use, health, and related disabilities who were experiencing long-term chronic homelessness. Eleven communities received 3-year grants from HHS and VA (2003–2006) and up to 5-year grants from HUD (2003–2008) to implement the initiative. This article provides background on chronic homelessness, describes the federal collaboration to comprehensively address chronic homelessness, and introduces the seven articles in this special issue that describe the findings and lessons learned from the participating communities in addressing chronic homelessness. Collectively, these articles offer insight into the challenges and benefits of providing housing and services to individuals experiencing chronic homelessness.

Keywords

homelessness chronic housing supportive services mental health services substance use disorders 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Recognition and appreciation to the members of the Policy Group that developed the Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness: ICH: Philip F. Mangano and Mary Silveira; HHS: Walter Leginski, Jane Taylor, Michael J. English, Frances L. Randolph, Jean Hochron, and Lyman Van Nostrand; HUD: John Garrity, Mark Johnston, and Laura Hogshead; and VA: Pete Dougherty, Robert Rosenheck, and Al Taylor. Appreciation to Dr. James Herrell, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, for his contribution as editor for this special issue.

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Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence D. Rickards
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sarah A. McGraw
    • 3
    Email author
  • Lynnette Araki
    • 4
  • Roger J. Casey
    • 5
  • Cynthia W. High
    • 6
  • Mary Ellen Hombs
    • 7
  • Robyn S. Raysor
    • 8
  1. 1.Washington, DCUSA
  2. 2.Homeless Programs Branch, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services AdministrationUS Department of Health and Human ServicesRockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Center for Qualitative ResearchNew England Research InstitutesWatertownUSA
  4. 4.Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Legislation, Health Resources and Services AdministrationUS Department of Health and Human ServicesRockvilleUSA
  5. 5.VA Homeless Providers, Homeless Grant/Per Diem Program, Office of Mental Health Services (116E)US Department of Veterans AffairsWashington, DCUSA
  6. 6.Special Needs Assistance Program, Office of Community Planning and DevelopmentUS Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentWashington, DCUSA
  7. 7.US Interagency Council on HomelessnessWashington, DCUSA
  8. 8.Special Needs Assistance Program, Office of Community Planning and DevelopmentUS Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentWashington, DCUSA

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