An Examination of Fulfilled Housing Preferences and Quality of Life among Homeless Persons with Mental Illness and/or Substance Use Disorders

  • Maria O’Connell
  • Robert Rosenheck
  • Wesley Kasprow
  • Linda Frisman
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s11414-006-9029-z

Cite this article as:
O’Connell, M., Rosenheck, R., Kasprow, W. et al. JBHSR (2006) 33: 354. doi:10.1007/s11414-006-9029-z

Abstract

This study examined the types of housing features considered important to a sample of homeless persons diagnosed with a mental illness and/or substance use disorder and the relationship between the degree to which important features were obtained in subsequent housing and subjective quality of life, clinical and housing outcomes at 3-month and 1-year follow-up periods. After controlling for significant clinical and sociodemographic covariates, results from regression analyses indicate that the degree to which a client's individual housing preferences were realized in dwellings is significantly associated with greater quality of life in the future, but not clinical outcomes or housing tenure.

Copyright information

© National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria O’Connell
    • 1
  • Robert Rosenheck
  • Wesley Kasprow
  • Linda Frisman
  1. 1.Yale Department of Psychiatry and Yale Program for Recovery and Community HealthNew HavenUSA

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