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Reliability and Validity of the BASIS-24© Mental Health Survey for Whites, African-Americans, and Latinos

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Abstract

Increasing racial and ethnic diversity calls for mental health assessment instruments that are appropriate, reliable, and valid for the wide range of cultures that comprise the current US population. However, most assessment instruments have not been tested on diverse samples. This study assessed psychometric properties and sensitivity to change of the revised Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24©) among the three largest race/ethnicity groups in the USA: Whites, African-Americans, and Latinos. BASIS-24© assessments were obtained for 2436 inpatients and 2975 outpatients treated at one of 27 mental health and/or substance abuse programs. Confirmatory factor analysis and several psychometric tests supported the factor structure, reliability, concurrent validity, and sensitivity of the instrument within each race/ethnicity group, although discriminant validity may be weaker for African-Americans and Latinos than for Whites. Further research is needed to test and validate assessment instruments with other race/ethnicity groups.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by grant R01 MH58240 from the National Institute of Mental Health and by the Veterans Administration Health Services Research & Development program. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs. The authors thank the clinical programs that participated in this research and colleagues Barbara Bokhour, Ph.D., Rani Elwy, Ph.D. Donald Miller, Sc.D., and Avron Spiro III, Ph.D., for their comments on earlier versions of this manuscript.

Author information

Correspondence to Susan V. Eisen PhD.

Additional information

Mariana Gerena, PhD, is a senior research scientist at the Institute on Urban Health Research, 503 Stearns, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Phone: +1-617-3735177. Fax: +1-617-3737309. E-mail: gerena@neu.edu.

Gayatri Ranganathan, MS, is a biostatistician at MetaWorks Inc., 10 President’s Landing, Medford, MA 02155, USA. Phone: +1-781-3950700. Fax: +1-781-3957336. E-mail: gayatrir@bu.edu.

David Esch, PhD, is an analyst at MDT Advisers, 125 Cambridge Park Drive, Cambridge, MA 02140-2329, USA. Phone: +1-617-2342200. Fax: +1-617-2342210. E-mail: esch@mdtai.com.

Thomas Idiculla, MSW, is a doctoral candidate at the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work and Quality Indicators Data Manager, Department of Mental Health Services Evaluation, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02478, USA. Phone: +1-617-8552432. Fax: +1-617-8552948. E-mail: idicult@mcleanpo.mclean.org.

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Eisen, S.V., Gerena, M., Ranganathan, G. et al. Reliability and Validity of the BASIS-24© Mental Health Survey for Whites, African-Americans, and Latinos. JBHSR 33, 304 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-006-9025-3

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Keywords

  • Mental Health
  • Summary Score
  • Physical Component Summary
  • Mental Component Summary
  • Emotional Lability