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Cultural ways of constructing knowledge: the role of identities in online group discussions

  • Murat Öztok
Article

Abstract

Learning scientists and the CSCL community have argued that knowledge construction is a process of collective thinking; a process that is simultaneously personal and social that requires group cognition. However, while CSCL researchers have investigated situated knowledge in the process of collective thinking, little work has been done to fully understand how different identification categories play a role in sense-making and knowledge construction. This research, therefore, explores in detail how individuals operationalize identification categories when they engage in group discussions in online learning environments. Results demonstrate that individuals do not experience online learning through only one aspect of their identity. Rather, learning experiences evoke different elements of their identities that are used continuously and simultaneously when they collaborate with each other in the phases of knowledge construction.

Keywords

Identification Group work Online discussions Knowledge construction Identity Case studies Culture 

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Copyright information

© International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational ResearchLancaster UniversityLancasterUK

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