Metacognition and Learning

, Volume 2, Issue 2–3, pp 57–65 | Cite as

Understanding the complex nature of self-regulatory processes in learning with computer-based learning environments: an introduction

Article

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Institute for Intelligent SystemsUniversity of MemphisMemphisUSA

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