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International Journal of Hindu Studies

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 1–25 | Cite as

Mirrored warriors: On the cultural identity of Rajasthani traders

  • Lawrence A. Babb
Article

Keywords

Social Order Political Authority Animal Sacrifice Indian Trader Feudal Lord 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© World Heritage Press Inc 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence A. Babb
    • 1
  1. 1.Amherst CollegeUSA

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