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International Journal of Hindu Studies

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 191–207 | Cite as

Temple and Human Bodies: Representing Hinduism

  • George PatiEmail author
Article

Keywords

Native Context Processual Body Sectarian Group Worship Service Indian Immigrant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Valparaiso UniversityValparaisUSA

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