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Philosophia

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How Not to Individuate Destiny: a Critique of Segun Ogungbemi’s Conception of Destiny

  • Olúkáyọ̀dé R. AdéṣuyìEmail author
Article

Abstract

The social nature of human beings and individualistic characterizing destiny of individuals is contradictory and call for philosophical interrogation. Segun Ogungbemi has unrepentantly argued that destiny is individualistic and neither connective nor collective. This paper critiques Segun Ogungbemi’s conception of destiny, instead, argues for connectiveness and collectiveness of destiny. It argues that destiny, as an individualistic phenomenon, challenges and raises the Yorùbá notion of corporate communal existence. The paper concludes that individuating destiny is not only a non-plausible conception; it is also not tenable in any possible social world.

Keywords

Destiny Communo-centric destiny Collective destiny Connective destiny Ego-centric destiny 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyAdekunle Ajasin UniversityAkungba-AkokoNigeria

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