Journal of Soils and Sediments

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 714–717 | Cite as

DanTox—a novel joint research project using zebrafish (Danio rerio) to identify specific toxicity and molecular modes of action of sediment-bound pollutants

  • Steffen Keiter
  • Sabrina Peddinghaus
  • Ute Feiler
  • Britta von der Goltz
  • Christoph Hafner
  • Nga Yu Ho
  • Sepand Rastegar
  • Jens C. Otte
  • Richard Ottermanns
  • Georg Reifferscheid
  • Uwe Strähle
  • Thomas Braunbeck
  • Monika Hammers-Wirtz
  • Henner Hollert
PROJECT PRESENTATION

Abstract

Introduction

The European Water Framework Directive aims to achieve a good ecological and chemical status in surface water of European rivers by the year 2015. Since sediments and particulate matter act as secondary sources for pollutants, applied sediment toxicology is perceived to play a major role for obtaining new knowledge that can contribute to successful attainment of the goal. However, the existing bioassays for sediment toxicity analyses do not provide sufficient data concerning bioavailability of environmental pollutants. In this regard, there is an urgent need to combine sediment contact assays with gene expression analysis to investigate mechanism-specific sediment toxicity.

Purpose

The aim of the novel joint research project is to develop a eukaryotic test system, which can be used to investigate the ecotoxicological effects of contaminated sediments on gene expression level (DNA-array and RT-PCR). Current ecotoxicological research customarily involves a battery of bioassays to cover different toxicological endpoints (e.g., teratogenicity, genotoxicity, mutagenicity, Ah-receptor-mediated toxicity, neurotoxicity). In contrast, methods that detect alterations in gene expression offer deeper insight by elucidating how chemical exposure and/or environmental challenge affect multiple metabolic pathways leading to these particular kinds of toxic response. Gene expression profiles reflect the way cells and organisms adapt or respond to a changing environment.

Conclusion

The present project aspires to increase the fundamental molecular and physiological knowledge concerning the mode of action of environmental toxicants in zebrafish (Danio rerio). By working with partners from the academic and research institutions as well as from industry and waterway regulations, the success of this basic research-driven joint project in terms of development and implementation of novel sediment toxicity methods will be realized.

Keywords

Danio rerio Genomics Sediments Toxicity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steffen Keiter
    • 1
  • Sabrina Peddinghaus
    • 1
  • Ute Feiler
    • 2
  • Britta von der Goltz
    • 3
  • Christoph Hafner
    • 4
  • Nga Yu Ho
    • 6
  • Sepand Rastegar
    • 6
  • Jens C. Otte
    • 6
  • Richard Ottermanns
    • 5
  • Georg Reifferscheid
    • 2
  • Uwe Strähle
    • 6
  • Thomas Braunbeck
    • 3
  • Monika Hammers-Wirtz
    • 5
  • Henner Hollert
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Environmental Research (Biology V), Department of Ecosystem AnalysisRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany
  2. 2.German Federal Institute for HydrologyKoblenzGermany
  3. 3.Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Group, Department of ZoologyUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  4. 4.Hydrotox GmbHFreiburgGermany
  5. 5.Research Institute GAIACAachenGermany
  6. 6.Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Toxicology and Genetics (ITG)Eggenstein-LeopoldshafenGermany

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