AGE

, 28:125

Identification of longevity-associated genes in long-lived Snell and Ames dwarf mice

  • W. H. Boylston
  • James H. DeFord
  • John Papaconstantinou
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11357-006-9008-6

Cite this article as:
Boylston, W.H., DeFord, J.H. & Papaconstantinou, J. AGE (2006) 28: 125. doi:10.1007/s11357-006-9008-6

Abstract

Recent landmark molecular genetic studies have identified an evolutionarily conserved insulin/IGF-1 signal transduction pathway that regulates lifespan. In C. elegans, Drosophila, and rodents, attenuated insulin/IGF-1 signaling appears to regulate lifespan and enhance resistance to environmental stress. The Ames (Prop1df/df) and Snell (Pit1dw/dw) hypopituitary dwarf mice with growth hormone (GH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin deficiencies live 40–60% longer than control mice. Both mutants are resistant to multiple forms of environmental stress in vitro. Taken collectively, these genetic models indicate that diminished insulin/IGF-l signaling may play a central role in the determination of mammalian lifespan by conferring resistance to exogenous and endogenous stressors. These pleiotropic endocrine pathways control diverse programs of gene expression that appear to orchestrate the development of a biological phenotype that promotes longevity. With the ability to investigate thousands of genes simultaneously, several microarray surveys have identified potential longevity assurance genes and provided information on the mechanism(s) by which the dwarf genotypes (dw/dw) and (df/df), and caloric restriction may lead to longevity. We propose that a comparison of specific changes in gene expression shared between Snell and Ames dwarf mice may provide a deeper understanding of the transcriptional mechanisms of longevity determination. Furthermore, we propose that a comparison of the physiological consequences of the Pit1dw and Prop1df mutations may reveal transcriptional profiles similar to those reported for the C. elegans and Drosophila mutants. In this study we have identified classes of genes whose expression is similarly affected in both Snell and Ames dwarf mice. Our comparative microarray data suggest that specific detoxification enzymes of the P450 (CYP) family as well as oxidative and steroid metabolism may play a key role in longevity assurance of the Snell and Ames dwarf mouse mutants. We propose that the altered expression of these genes defines a biochemical phenotype which may promote longevity in Snell and Ames dwarf mice.

Key words

Aging Ames Dwarf Detoxification Metabolism P450 PPAR ROS Snell Dwarf Steriod 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. H. Boylston
    • 1
  • James H. DeFord
    • 2
    • 3
  • John Papaconstantinou
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.The Clayton Foundation for ResearchHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyUniversity of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA

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