Advertisement

Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 26, Issue 30, pp 31548–31549 | Cite as

Creative conservation in China: releasing captive giant pandas into the wild

  • Mingsheng Hong
  • Wei Wei
  • Hong Zhou
  • Junfeng Tang
  • Han Han
  • Zejun ZhangEmail author
Letter to the Editor
  • 88 Downloads

From November 7 to 11, 2018, the International Conference for the Giant Panda Conservation and Breeding (ICGPCB) was held in Chengdu, China. Over 400 experts from China and other countries shared their knowledge and experience in panda conservation and breeding, addressing multiple topics ranging from nutrition, behavior, disease to community education, and so on (Chengdu Research Base of Giant panda Breeding 2018). On this symposium, it is noteworthy that application of science to panda population restoration is blossoming, with 6 reports addressing releasing captive individuals into the wild.

To reverse human impacts, conservation translocations are extensively adopted in western countries to conserve rare animals, but less attempted in developing countries (Seddon et al. 2014; Armstrong et al. 2019). In China, discussions on captive panda release can be traced back to 1997, when the international symposium on the feasibility of captive-bred panda release was held in Wolong Nature...

Notes

Funding information

This work received financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31900337; 31670530), Ministry of Science and Technology (2016YFC0503200), and Fundamental Research Funds of China West Normal University (18B025; 18Q040).

References

  1. Armstrong DP, Seddon PJ, Moehrenschlager A (2019) Reintroduction. Encyclopedia of ecology (Second Edition), Reference module in earth systems and environmental sciences, 1: 485–466Google Scholar
  2. Chengdu Research Base of Giant panda Breeding (2018) The international conference for the giant panda conservation and breeding. Available from http://www.panda.org.cn/china/news/activities/2018-11-08/7111.html. Accessed 22 Nov 2018
  3. Hong MS, Yuan SB, Yang ZS, Yang XY, Gu XD, Huang F, Zhang ZJ (2015) Comparison of microhabitat selection and trace abundance of giant pandas between primary and secondary forests in Liziping Nature Reserve, China: effects of selective logging. Mamm Biol 80:373–379CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Hong MS, Wei W, Yang ZS, Yuan SB, Yang XY, Gu XD, Huang F, Zhang ZJ (2016) Effects of timber harvesting on Arundinaria spanostachya bamboo and feeding-site selection by giant pandas in Liziping Nature Reserve, China. For Ecol Manag 373:74–80CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. IUCN/SSC (2013) Guidelines for reintroductions and other conservation translocations. Version 1.0. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN Species Survival CommissionGoogle Scholar
  6. Li YX, Swaisgood RR, Wei W, Nie YG, Hu YB, Yang XY, Gu XD, Zhang ZJ (2017) Withered on the stem: is bamboo a seasonally limiting resource for giant pandas? Environ Sci Pollut Res 24:10537–10546CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. News.sina (2007) The first giant panda released into the wild has died unexpectedly. Available from http://www.news.sina.com.cn/c/2007-05-31/163011933303s.shtml. Accessed 24 Nov 2018
  8. Seddon PJ, Griffiths CJ, Soorae PS, Armstrong DP (2014) Reversing defaunation: restoring species in a changing world. Science 345:406–412CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. State Council Information Office of China (2015) Available from http://www.scio.gov.cn/xwfbh/gbwxwfbh/fbh/Document/1395514/1395514.htm. Accessed 22 Nov 2018
  10. Wei FW, Swaisgood RR, Hu YB, Nie YG, Yan L, Zhang ZJ, Qi DW, Zhu LF (2015) Progress in the ecology and conservation of giant pandas. Conserv Biol 29:1497–1507CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Wei W, Swaisgood RR, Dai Q, Yang ZS, Yuan SB, Owen MA, Pilfold NW, Yang XY, Gu XD, Zhou H, Han H, Zhang JD, Hong MS, Zhang ZJ (2018) Giant panda distributional and habitat-use shifts in a changing Landscape. Conserv Lett 11:e12575CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. West China City Daily (2005) 70 Media See the Giant Panda “ChengLin 1” Released. Available from http://www.china.com.cn/chinese/huanjing/935223.htm. Accessed 24 Nov 2018
  13. Yang ZS, Guc XD, Nie YG, Huang F, Huang Y, Dai Q, Hu YB, Yang Y, Zhou X, Zhang HM, Yang XY, Wei FW (2018) Reintroduction of the giant panda into the wild: a good start suggests a bright future. Biol Conserv 217:181–186CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Yao R, Xu LL, Hu T, Chen H, Qi DW, Gu XD, Yang XY, Yang ZS, Zhu LF (2019) The “wildness” of the giant panda gut microbiome and its relevance to effective translocation. Global Ecology and Conservation 18:e00644CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Zhang ZJ, Swaisgood RR, Zhang SN, Nordstrom LA, Wang HJ, Gu XD, Hu JC, Wei FW (2011) Old-growth forest is what giant pandas really need. Biol Lett 7:403–406CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Zhang MC, Huang Y, Hong MS, Zhou SQ, Huang JY, Li DS, Li RG, Liu D, Zhou XP, Zhang HM (2017) Impacts of man-made provisioned food on learned cub behaviours of giant pandas in pre-release reintroduction training. Folia Zool 66(1):50–58CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mingsheng Hong
    • 1
  • Wei Wei
    • 1
  • Hong Zhou
    • 1
  • Junfeng Tang
    • 1
  • Han Han
    • 1
  • Zejun Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Southwest China Wildlife Resources Conservation (Ministry of Education)China West Normal UniversityNanchongChina

Personalised recommendations