Advertisement

Improved Jayaweera-Mikkelsen model to quantify ammonia volatilization from rice paddy fields in China

  • Xiaoying Zhan
  • Chuan Chen
  • Qihui Wang
  • Feng ZhouEmail author
  • Kentaro Hayashi
  • Xiaotang Ju
  • Shu Kee Lam
  • Yonghua Wang
  • Yali Wu
  • Jin Fu
  • Luping Zhang
  • Shuoshuo Gao
  • Xikang Hou
  • Yan Bo
  • Dan Zhang
  • Kaiwen Liu
  • Qixia Wu
  • Rongrui Su
  • Jianqiang Zhu
  • Changliang Yang
  • Chaomeng Dai
  • Hongbin Liu
Research Article
  • 45 Downloads

Abstract

Current estimates of China’s ammonia (NH3) volatilization from paddy rice differ by more than twofold, mainly due to inappropriate application of chamber-based measurements and improper assumptions within process-based models. Here, we improved the Jayaweera-Mikkelsen (JM) model through multiplying the concentration of aqueous NH3 in ponded water by an activity coefficient that was determined based on high-frequency flux observations at Jingzhou station in Central China. We found that the improved JM model could reproduce the dynamics of observed NH3 flux (R2 = 0.83, n = 228, P < 0.001), while the original JM model without the consideration of activity of aqueous NH3 overstated NH3 flux by 54% during the periods of fertilization and pesticide application. The validity of the improved JM model was supported by a mass-balance-based indirect estimate at Jingzhou station and the independent flux observations from the other five stations across China. The NH3 volatilization losses that were further simulated by the improved JM model forced by actual wind speed were in general a half less than previous chamber-based estimates at six stations. Difference in wind speed between the inside and outside of the chamber and insufficient sampling frequency were identified as the primary and secondary causes for the overestimation in chamber-based estimations, respectively. Together, our findings suggest that an in-depth understanding of NH3 transfer process and its robust representation in models are critical for developing regional emission inventories and practical mitigation strategies of NH3.

Keywords

Improved Jayaweera-Mikkelsen model NH3 Dynamic chamber Model simulation Paddy field 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2018YFC0213304), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41671464), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2017M620503), Interdisciplinarity Fund of Peak Discipline from Shanghai Municipal Education Commission (0200121005/053), and the 111 Project (B14001). We appreciated Jianping Wang, Yumin An, Zaizhen Zhang, Jinghong Tan, Gongyou Yu, Sheng Wang, and Bingyu Chen for collecting and analyzing samples and Prof. Bin Yin for designing dynamic chambers.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interest.

Supplementary material

11356_2019_4275_MOESM1_ESM.docx (650 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 649 kb)

References

  1. Balasubramanian S, Nelson A, Koloutsou-Vakakis S et al (2017) Evaluation of DeNitrification DeComposition model for estimating ammonia fluxes from chemical fertilizer application. Agric For Meteorol 237:123–134CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bao SD (2013) Soil and agricultural chemistry analysis. China Agriculture PressGoogle Scholar
  3. Cao YS, Tian YH, Yin B, Zhu Z (2013) Assessment of ammonia volatilization from paddy fields under crop management practices aimed to increase grain yield and N efficiency. Field Crop Res 147:23–31CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Das P, Sa JH, Kim KH, Jeon EC (2009) Effect of fertilizer application on ammonia emission and concentration levels of ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite ions in a rice field. Environ Monit Assess 154:275–282CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. DeHoff RT (2006) Thermodynamics in materials science (2nd ed.) (Boca Raton, Fla.: CRC Taylor & Francis. pp. 230–231. ISBN 9780849340659)Google Scholar
  6. Dong NM, Brandt KK, Sorensen J et al (2012) Effects of alternating wetting and drying versus continuous flooding on fertilizer nitrogen fate in rice fields in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Soil Biol Biochem 47:166–174CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dutta B, Congreves KA, Smith WN, Grant BB, Rochette P, Chantigny MH, Desjardins RL (2016) Improving DNDC model to estimate ammonia loss from urea fertilizer application in temperate agroecosystems. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 106:275–292CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Elser JJ, Andersen T, Baron JS, Bergstrom AK, Jansson M, Kyle M, Nydick KR, Steger L, Hessen DO (2009) Shifts in lake N:P stoichiometry and nutrient limitation driven by atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Science 326:835–837CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Fu X, Wang SX, Ran LM, Pleim JE, Cooter E, Bash JO, Benson V, Hao JM (2015) Estimating NH3 emissions from agricultural fertilizer application in China using the bi-directional CMAQ model coupled to an agro-ecosystem model. Atmos Chem Phys 15:6637–6649CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Guo JH, Liu XJ, Zhang Y, Shen JL, Han WX, Zhang WF, Christie P, Goulding KWT, Vitousek PM, Zhang FS (2010) Significant acidification in major Chinese croplands. Science 327:1008–1010CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hafner SD, Mulbry W, Ingram SK (2012) A pH-based method for measuring gaseous ammonia. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 92:195–205CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Hauglustaine DA, Balkanski Y, Schulz M (2014) A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate. Atmos Chem Phys 14:11031–11063CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Hayashi K, Nishimura S, Yagi K (2006) Ammonia volatilization from the surface of a Japanese paddy field during rice cultivation. Soil Sci Plant Nutr 52:545–555CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hayashi K, Nishimura S, Yagi K (2008) Ammonia volatilization from a paddy field following applications of urea: rice plants are both an absorber and an emitter for atmospheric ammonia. Sci Total Environ 390:485–494CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Haynes WM (ed) (2013) CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 94th edn. CRC Press, Boca Raton pp 9–26Google Scholar
  16. Henze DK, Shindell DT, Akhtar F, Spurr RJD, Pinder RW, Loughlin D, Kopacz M, Singh K, Shim C (2012) Spatially refined aerosol direct radiative forcing efficiencies. Environ Sci Technol 46:9511–9518CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Huang RJ, Zhang YL, Bozzetti C, Ho KF, Cao JJ, Han Y, Daellenbach KR, Slowik JG, Platt SM, Canonaco F, Zotter P, Wolf R, Pieber SM, Bruns EA, Crippa M, Ciarelli G, Piazzalunga A, Schwikowski M, Abbaszade G, Schnelle-Kreis J, Zimmermann R, An Z, Szidat S, Baltensperger U, Haddad IE, Prévôt ASH (2014) High secondary aerosol contribution to particulate pollution during haze events in China. Nature 514:218–222CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Jayaweera GR, Mikkelsen DS (1990) Ammonia volatilization from flooded soil systems—a computer model. 1. Theoretical aspects. Soil Sci Soc Am J 54:1447–1455Google Scholar
  19. Jayaweera GR, Mikkelsen DS, Paw KT (1990) Ammonia volatilization from flooded soil systems—a computer model. 3 Validation of the model. Soil Sci Soc Am J 54:1462–1468Google Scholar
  20. Kang YN, Liu MX, Song Y, Huang X, Yao H, Cai X, Zhang H, Kang L, Liu X, Yan X, He H, Zhang Q, Shao M, Zhu T (2016) High-resolution ammonia emissions inventories in China from 1980 to 2012. Atmos Chem Phys 16:2043–2058CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Kissel DE, Brewer HL, Arkin GF (1977) Design and test of a field sampler for ammonia volatilization. Soil Sci Soc Am J 41:1133–1138CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Lelieveld J, Evans JS, Fnais M, Giannadaki D, Pozzer A (2015) The contribution of outdoor air pollution sources to premature mortality on a global scale. Nature 525:367–371CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Li CS (2000) Modeling trace gas emissions from agricultural ecosystems. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 58:259–276CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Li HL, Han Y, Cai ZC (2008) Modeling the ammonia volatilization from common urea and controlled releasing urea fertilizers in paddy soil of Taihu Region of China by Jayaweera-Mikkelsen model. Environ Sci 4:1045–1052Google Scholar
  25. Li Y, Schichtel BA, Walker JT, Schwede DB, Chen X, Lehmann CMB, Puchalski MA, Gay DA, Collett JL Jr (2016) Increasing importance of deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113:5874–5879CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Martines AM, Nogueira MA, Santos CA, Nakatani AS, Andrade CA, Coscione AR, Cantarella H, Sousa JP, Cardoso EJBN (2010) Ammonia volatilization in soil treated with tannery sludge. Bioresour Technol 101:4690–4696CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Ni K, Koster JR, Seidel A et al (2015) Field measurement of ammonia emissions after nitrogen fertilization—a comparison between micrometeorological and chamber methods. Eur J Agron 71:115–122CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Pacholski A, Cai GX, Nieder R, Richter J, Fan X, Zhu Z, Roelcke M (2006) Calibration of a simple method for determining ammonia volatilization in the field—comparative measurements in Henan Province, China. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 74:259–273CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Paredes DD, Lessa ACD, de Sant'Anna SAC et al (2014) Nitrous oxide emission and ammonia volatilization induced by vinasse and N fertilizer application in a sugarcane crop at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Nutr Cycl Agroecosyst 98: 41–55Google Scholar
  30. Paulot F, Jacob DJ (2014) Hidden cost of U.S. agricultural exports: particulate matter from ammonia emissions. Environ Sci Technol 48:903–908CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Roldin P, Eriksson AC, Nordin EZ, Hermansson E, Mogensen D, Rusanen A, Boy M, Swietlicki E, Svenningsson B, Zelenyuk A, Pagels J (2014) Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM. Atmos Chem Phys 14:7953–7993CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. SEPA (2002) Standard methods for the examination of water and wastewater. version 4 (China Environmental Science Press: Beijing)Google Scholar
  33. Shan LN, He YF, Chen J, Huang Q, Wang H (2015) Ammonia volatilization from a Chinese cabbage field under different nitrogen treatments in the Taihu Lake Basin, China. J Environ Sci 38:14–23CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Sommer SG, Misselbrook TH (2016) A review of ammonia emission measured using wind tunnels compared with micrometeorological techniques. Soil Use Manag 32:101–108CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Tang YS, Braban CF, Dragosits U, Dore AJ, Simmons I, van Dijk N, Poskitt J, Dos Santos Pereira G, Keenan PO, Conolly C, Vincent K, Smith RI, Heal MR, Sutton MA (2018) Drivers for spatial, temporal and long-term trends in atmospheric ammonia and ammonium in the UK. Atmos Chem Phys 18:705–733CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Wang HH, Hu ZY, Lu J, Liu X, Wen G, Blaylock A (2016) Estimation of ammonia volatilization from a paddy field after application of controlled-release urea based on the modified Jayaweera-Mikkelsen model combined with the Sherlock-Goh model. Commun Soil Sci Plant Anal 47:1630–1643CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Wang HY, Zhang D, Zhang YT, Zhai L, Yin B, Zhou F, Geng Y, Pan J, Luo J, Gu B, Liu H (2018) Ammonia emissions from paddy fields are underestimated in China. Environ Pollut 235:482–488CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Wang R, Balkanski Y, Bopp L, Aumont O, Boucher O, Ciais P, Gehlen M, Peñuelas J, Ethé C, Hauglustaine D, Li B, Liu J, Zhou F, Tao S (2015) Influence of anthropogenic aerosol deposition on the relationship between oceanic productivity and warming. Geophys Res Lett 42:10745–10754CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Wang R, Goll D, Balkanski Y, Hauglustaine D, Boucher O, Ciais P, Janssens I, Penuelas J, Guenet B, Sardans J, Bopp L, Vuichard N, Zhou F, Li B, Piao S, Peng S, Huang Y, Tao S (2017) Global forest carbon uptake due to nitrogen and phosphorus deposition from 1850 to 2100. Glob Chang Biol 23:4854–4872CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Watanabe T, Son TT, Hung NN, van Truong N, Giau TQ, Hayashi K, Ito O (2009) Measurement of ammonia volatilization from flooded paddy fields in Vietnam. Soil Sci Plant Nutr 55:793–799CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Xu P, Liao YJ, Lin YH, Zhao CX, Yan CH, Cao MN, Wang GS, Luan SJ (2016) High-resolution inventory of ammonia emissions from agricultural fertilizer in China from 1978 to 2008. Atmos Chem Phys 16:1207–1218CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Yan XY, Akimoto H, Ohara T (2003) Estimation of nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and ammonia emissions from croplands in East, Southeast and South Asia. Glob Chang Biol 9:1080–1096CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Zhan XY, Zhou F, Liu XJ et al (2017) Evidence for the importance of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to eutrophic lake Dianchi, China. Environ Sci Technol 51:6699–6708CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Zhang L, Chen YF, Zhao YH, Henze DK, Zhu L, Song Y, Paulot F, Liu X, Pan Y, Lin Y, Huang B (2018a) Agricultural ammonia emissions in China: reconciling bottom-up and top-down estimates. Atmos Chem Phys 18:339–355CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Zhang W, Li Y, Zhu B et al (2018b) A process-oriented hydro-biogeochemical model enabling simulation of gaseous carbon and nitrogen emissions and hydrologic nitrogen losses from a subtropical catchment. Sci Total Environ 616:305–317CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Zheng JS, Kilasara MM, Mmari WN, Funakawa S (2018) Ammonia volatilization following urea application at maize fields in the East African highlands with different soil properties. Biol Fertil Soils 54:411–422CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Zhou F, Ciais P, Hayashi K, Galloway J, Kim DG, Yang C, Li S, Liu B, Shang Z, Gao S (2016) Re-estimating NH3 emissions from Chinese cropland by a new nonlinear model. Environ Sci Technol 50:564–572CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoying Zhan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chuan Chen
    • 3
  • Qihui Wang
    • 1
  • Feng Zhou
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kentaro Hayashi
    • 4
  • Xiaotang Ju
    • 5
  • Shu Kee Lam
    • 6
  • Yonghua Wang
    • 1
  • Yali Wu
    • 1
  • Jin Fu
    • 1
  • Luping Zhang
    • 7
  • Shuoshuo Gao
    • 1
  • Xikang Hou
    • 1
  • Yan Bo
    • 1
  • Dan Zhang
    • 8
  • Kaiwen Liu
    • 9
  • Qixia Wu
    • 7
  • Rongrui Su
    • 9
  • Jianqiang Zhu
    • 7
  • Changliang Yang
    • 10
  • Chaomeng Dai
    • 11
  • Hongbin Liu
    • 8
  1. 1.Sino-France Institute of Earth Systems Science, Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental SciencesPeking UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Agricultural Clean Watershed Research Group, Chinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesInstitute of Environment and Sustainable Development in AgricultureBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Institute of International Rivers and Eco-securityYunnan UniversityKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Division of Biogeochemical Cycles, National Agriculture and Food Research OrganizationInstitute for Agro-Environmental SciencesIbarakiJapan
  5. 5.College of Resources and Environmental SciencesChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  6. 6.School of Agriculture and Food, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural SciencesThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  7. 7.College of AgricultureYangtze UniversityJingzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  8. 8.Key Laboratory of Nonpoint Source Pollution Control, Ministry of Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesInstitute of Agricultural Resources and Regional PlanningBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  9. 9.Jingzhou Agrometeorological Experimental StationJingzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  10. 10.School of Ecology and Environmental ScienceYunnan UniversityKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  11. 11.Department of Hydraulic Engineering, College of Civil EngineeringTongji UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

Personalised recommendations