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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 1892–1901 | Cite as

Evaluation of hematological, biochemical parameters and thiol enzyme activity in chrome plating workers

  • Larissa Machado Lacerda
  • Solange Cristina Garcia
  • Luciano Basso da Silva
  • Mariana de Ávila Dornelles
  • Anelise Teresinha Presotto
  • Eloir Dutra Lourenço
  • Itiane Diehl de Franceschi
  • Elissa Fernandes
  • Clovis Milton Duval Wannmacher
  • Natália Brucker
  • Elisa Sauer
  • Adriana Gioda
  • Aline Belem MachadoEmail author
  • Evandro Oliveira
  • Thereza Luciano Trombini
  • Luciane Rosa Feksa
Research Article
  • 41 Downloads

Abstract

The most commonly used solution in chrome plating bath is chromic acid (hexavalent Cr), and a considerable amount of mists is released into the air and consequently produce hazards to workers. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the biomarker of exposure to metals, specially Cr levels, presents associations with hematological and biochemical parameters and if they can alter the activity of enzymes that contain thiol groups such as pyruvate kinase, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase, and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase. Fifty male chrome plating workers were used for exposed group and 50 male non-exposed workers for control group. For that, biological monitoring was performed through quantification of metals on total blood and urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and enzyme activity was performed by spectrometry in erythrocytes. In addition, chromium levels in water was quantified and ecotoxicology assay was performed with Allium cepa test. The results demonstrated that blood and urinary chromium levels in exposed group were higher than the control group (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, decreased activity of enzymes was found in those that contain thiol groups from exposed group when compared with the control group (p < 0.001). The water analysis did not present a statistical difference between control and exposed groups (p > 0.05), demonstrating that water did not seem to be the source of contamination. In summary, our findings indicated some toxicology effects observed in the exposed group, such as thiol enzyme inhibition, mainly associated with occupational exposure in chrome plating and besides the presence of other metals, and Cr demonstrated to influence the activity of the enzymes analyzed in this research.

Keywords

Biomonitoring Occupational exposure Chromium Thiol-containing enzymes Water 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Foundation of Research Support of Rio Grande do Sul State (FAPERGS, grant to Feksa LR Nos. 187012-3/2012 and provided a Msc research fellowship to Machado LL), National Council of Research and Development (CNPq) and Feevale University. The authors would like to thank the researchers of Laboratory of Toxicology (LATOX) of Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, coordinated by Professor Solange Cristina Garcia, and the researchers of Laboratory of Innate Errors of Metabolism of Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, coordinated by Professor Clóvis Wannmacher. The authors would like to thank the participants of this study.

Compliance with ethical standards

The Committee of Ethics in Research of the Feevale University approved this study (project number 2.14.01.11.2242). An informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larissa Machado Lacerda
    • 1
  • Solange Cristina Garcia
    • 2
  • Luciano Basso da Silva
    • 1
  • Mariana de Ávila Dornelles
    • 3
  • Anelise Teresinha Presotto
    • 3
  • Eloir Dutra Lourenço
    • 3
  • Itiane Diehl de Franceschi
    • 4
  • Elissa Fernandes
    • 4
  • Clovis Milton Duval Wannmacher
    • 4
  • Natália Brucker
    • 5
  • Elisa Sauer
    • 2
  • Adriana Gioda
    • 6
  • Aline Belem Machado
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  • Evandro Oliveira
    • 1
  • Thereza Luciano Trombini
    • 1
  • Luciane Rosa Feksa
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Environmental Quality Post-Graduation ProgramFeevale UniversityNovo HamburgoBrazil
  2. 2.Laboratory of Toxicology (LATOX)Federal University of Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  3. 3.Health Sciences InstituteFeevale UniversityNovo HamburgoBrazil
  4. 4.Biochemistry DepartmentFederal University of Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  5. 5.Department of Physiology and PharmacologyFederal University of Santa MariaSanta MariaBrazil
  6. 6.Department of ChemistryPontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio)Rio de JaneiroBrazil

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