Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 24, Issue 25, pp 20626–20633 | Cite as

Survey on awareness and attitudes of secondary school students regarding plastic pollution: implications for environmental education and public health in Sharjah city, UAE

  • Mohammad Bakri Alaa Hammami
  • Eman Qasem Mohammed
  • Anas Mohammad Hashem
  • Mina Amer Al-Khafaji
  • Fatima Alqahtani
  • Shaikha Alzaabi
  • Nihar Dash
Research Article
  • 352 Downloads

Abstract

Since the industrial revolution in the 1800s, plastic pollution is becoming a global reality. This study aims to assess knowledge and attitude about plastic pollution among secondary school students in Sharjah city, United Arab Emirates. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 400 students in 6 different secondary schools in Sharjah city. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed through probability stratified random sampling method between February and April 2016. Majority of the population understands how harmful plastic wastes are to the environment (85.5%). However, the students’ mean knowledge score was 53%, with females (P < 0.01), grades 11 and 12 (P = 0.024), and students whose mothers were more educated (P = 0.014) being more knowledgeable and inclined towards pro-environmental behavior. Yet, all students showed tendency to be involved in the fighting against this dilemma. Strategies which address deficiencies, provide incentives for change, and assure governmental support along with environmental education are needed to bridge the information gap and enhance opportunities to adopt pro-environmental behaviors.

Keywords

Plastics Pollution Environmental awareness Public health Secondary school 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammad Bakri Alaa Hammami
    • 1
  • Eman Qasem Mohammed
    • 1
  • Anas Mohammad Hashem
    • 1
  • Mina Amer Al-Khafaji
    • 1
  • Fatima Alqahtani
    • 1
  • Shaikha Alzaabi
    • 1
  • Nihar Dash
    • 2
  1. 1.College of MedicineUniversity of SharjahSharjahUnited Arab Emirates
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Sciences, College of MedicineSharjah UniversitySharjahUnited Arab Emirates

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