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Effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on hematite dissolution promoted by desferrioxamine B

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Abstract

Siderophores, as strong chelators specific to iron, have been intensively studied in relation to the facilitation of biological iron acquisition from iron oxides. In this study, the dissolution of hematite in the presence of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB) and three low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs, i.e., oxalic, citric, or malic acid) was investigated at three pH conditions (3.0, 5.5, and 9.0). Hematite dissolution was pH-dependent and LMWOA-specific. The adsorption of DFOB on hematite was significantly higher at pH 9.0 than at the other pH values. The adsorption of oxalic acid on hematite, however, showed a descending trend as pH was increased, and adsorption of citric and malic acids was not significantly affected by pH. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results also indicated the occurrence of these ligands’ adsorption. After acidification, dissolved iron was detected only in suspensions of hematite pre-adsorbed with oxalic acid at pH 5.5 and 9.0 or pre-adsorbed with citric acid at pH 5.5, indicating that these LMWOAs promoted the formation of labile iron on the hematite surface. Based on previous research and the results of this study, a hypothetical model is proposed. These results provide insight into the effect of LMWOAs on the dissolution of hematite promoted by DFOB.

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Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful for the financial support from the National Science Foundation Committee of China (Nos. 41171374,41101483 and 41671313), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 16lgjc57), the National Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (No. 41225004), Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province, China (No. 2014A050503032), and the Research Fund Program of Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology (2016 K0005).

Author information

Correspondence to Shizhong Wang or Rongliang Qiu.

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Funding

This study was funded by the National Science Foundation Committee of China (Nos. 41171374, 41101483, and 41671313), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 16lgjc57), the National Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (No. 41225004), Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province, China (No. 2014A050503032), and the Research Fund Program of Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology (2016K0005).

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Research involving human participants and/ or animals

This research does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Responsible editor: Philippe Garrigues

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Lin, Q., Wang, Y., Yang, X. et al. Effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on hematite dissolution promoted by desferrioxamine B. Environ Sci Pollut Res 25, 163–173 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-9045-y

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Keywords

  • Desferrioxamine B (DFOB)
  • Low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs)
  • Dissolution
  • Hematite