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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 22, Issue 20, pp 16014–16021 | Cite as

Assessment of bioaerosol contamination (bacteria and fungi) in the largest urban wastewater treatment plant in the Middle East

  • Sadegh Niazi
  • Mohammad Sadegh Hassanvand
  • Amir Hossein Mahvi
  • Ramin Nabizadeh
  • Mahmood Alimohammadi
  • Samira Nabavi
  • Sasan Faridi
  • Asghar Dehghani
  • Mohammad Hoseini
  • Mohammad Moradi-Joo
  • Adel Mokamel
  • Homa Kashani
  • Navid Yarali
  • Masud Yunesian
Research Article

Abstract

Bioaerosol concentration was measured in wastewater treatment units in south of Tehran, the largest wastewater treatment plant in the Middle East. Active sampling was carried out around four operational units and a point as background. The results showed that the aeration tank with an average of 1016 CFU/m3 in winter and 1973 CFU/m3 in summer had the greatest effect on emission of bacterial bioaerosols. In addition, primary treatment had the highest impact on fungal emission. Among the bacteria, Micrococcus spp. showed the widest emission in the winter, and Bacillus spp. was dominant in summer. Furthermore, fungi such as Penicillium spp. and Cladosporium spp. were the dominant types in the seasons. Overall, significant relationship was observed between meteorological parameters and the concentration of bacterial and fungal aerosols.

Keywords

Air contamination Bioaerosols Wastewater treatment plant Tehran 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to the south of Tehran wastewater treatment plan for providing us with the sampling locations. This work was funded by the Institute for Environmental Research (IER) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (grant number 90-03-46-21153).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sadegh Niazi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mohammad Sadegh Hassanvand
    • 1
    • 2
  • Amir Hossein Mahvi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ramin Nabizadeh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mahmood Alimohammadi
    • 2
  • Samira Nabavi
    • 2
  • Sasan Faridi
    • 2
  • Asghar Dehghani
    • 4
  • Mohammad Hoseini
    • 2
  • Mohammad Moradi-Joo
    • 4
  • Adel Mokamel
    • 2
  • Homa Kashani
    • 5
  • Navid Yarali
    • 5
  • Masud Yunesian
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Air Pollution Research (CAPR), Institute for Environmental Research (IER)Tehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public HealthTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  3. 3.Center for Solid Waste Research (CSWR), Institute for Environmental Research (IER)Tehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  4. 4.Cancer Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  5. 5.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran

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