Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 22, Issue 13, pp 9807–9815 | Cite as

Study of the rice straw biodegradation in mixed culture of Trichoderma viride and Aspergillus niger by GC-MS and FTIR

  • Yaoning Chen
  • Jingxia Huang
  • Yuanping Li
  • Guangming Zeng
  • Jiachao Zhang
  • Aizhi Huang
  • Jie Zhang
  • Shuang Ma
  • Xuebin Tan
  • Wei Xu
  • Wei Zhou
Research Article

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the biodegradation ability of the mixed culture of Trichoderma viride and Aspergillus niger through the study of the organic matter extracted from rice straw and the lignocellulose structure by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results of the GC-MS showed that the mixed culture possessed shorter alkane (heptane) at the end of the incubation and more kinds of organic matter (except the alkanes, 29 kinds of organic matter were detected) than the pure cultures. It could be deduced that the organic matter could indicate the degradation degree of the lignocellulose to some extent. Moreover, pinene was detected in the mixed culture on days 5 and 10, which might represent the antagonistic relationship between T. viride and A. niger. The analysis of FTIR spectrums which indirectly verified the GC-MS results showed that the mixed culture possessed a better degradation of rice straw compared with the pure culture. Therefore, the methods used in this research could be considered as effective ones to investigate the lignocellulose degradation mechanism in mixed culture.

Keywords

Lignocellulose Biodegradation Mixed culture Trichoderma viride Aspergillus niger GC-MS FTIR 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was financially supported by the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (IRT0719), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (50808072, 50978088 and 50908078), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, the State Scholarship Fund, and the Hunan Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (13JJB002).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yaoning Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jingxia Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuanping Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Guangming Zeng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jiachao Zhang
    • 4
  • Aizhi Huang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jie Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shuang Ma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xuebin Tan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Environmental Science and EngineeringHunan UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University)Ministry of EducationChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of Chemistry and Environment EngineeringHunan City UniversityYiyangPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.College of Resources and EnvironmentHunan Agricultural UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China

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