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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 22, Issue 11, pp 8190–8200 | Cite as

Indoor/outdoor relationships of bioaerosol concentrations in a retirement home and a school dormitory

  • Sasan Faridi
  • Mohammad Sadegh Hassanvand
  • Kazem Naddafi
  • Masud YunesianEmail author
  • Ramin Nabizadeh
  • Mohammad Hossein Sowlat
  • Homa Kashani
  • Akbar Gholampour
  • Sadegh Niazi
  • Ahad Zare
  • Shahrokh Nazmara
  • Mahmood Alimohammadi
Research Article

Abstract

The concentrations of bacterial and fungal bioaerosols were measured in a retirement home and a school dormitory from May 2012 to May 2013. In the present work, two active and passive methods were used for bioaerosol sampling. The results from the present work indicated that Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. were the dominant bacterial genera, while the major fungal genera were Penicillium spp., Cladosporium spp., and Aspergillus spp. The results also indicated that the indoor-to-outdoor (I/O) ratios for total bacteria were 1.77 and 1.44 in the retirement home and the school dormitory, respectively; the corresponding values for total fungal spores were 1.23 and 1.08. The results suggested that in addition to outdoor sources, indoor sources also played a significant role in emitting bacterial and fungal bioaerosols in the retirement home and the school dormitory indoor.

Keywords

Bioaerosol Indoor/outdoor Retirement home School dormitory Tehran 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded by the Institute for Environmental Research (IER) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (grant number 90-03-46-18903).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sasan Faridi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mohammad Sadegh Hassanvand
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kazem Naddafi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Masud Yunesian
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ramin Nabizadeh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mohammad Hossein Sowlat
    • 1
  • Homa Kashani
    • 3
  • Akbar Gholampour
    • 4
  • Sadegh Niazi
    • 2
  • Ahad Zare
    • 5
  • Shahrokh Nazmara
    • 2
  • Mahmood Alimohammadi
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Air Pollution Research (CAPR), Institute for Environmental Research (IER)Tehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public HealthTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  4. 4.Department of Environmental Health EngineeringTabriz University of Medical SciencesTabrizIran
  5. 5.Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research InstituteTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran

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