Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 3820–3827

Mapping differential elemental accumulation in fish tissues: assessment of metal and trace element concentrations in wels catfish (Silurus glanis) from the Danube River by ICP-MS

  • Katarina Jovičić
  • Dragica M. Nikolić
  • Željka Višnjić-Jeftić
  • Vesna Đikanović
  • Stefan Skorić
  • Srđan M. Stefanović
  • Mirjana Lenhardt
  • Aleksandar Hegediš
  • Jasmina Krpo-Ćetković
  • Ivan Jarić
Research Article

Abstract

Studies of metal accumulation in fish are mainly focused on the muscle tissue, while the metal accumulation patterns in other tissues have been largely neglected. Muscle is not always a good indicator of the whole fish body contamination. Elemental accumulation in many fish tissues and organs and their potential use in monitoring programs have not received proper attention. In the present study, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn concentrations were assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the following 14 tissues of the wels catfish (Silurus glanis) from the Danube River: muscle, gills, spleen, liver, kidneys, intestine, gizzard, heart, brain, gallbladder, swim bladder, vertebra, operculum, and gonads. A high level of differential elemental accumulation among the studied tissues was observed. The maximum overall metal accumulation was observed in the vertebra, followed by the kidneys and liver, with the metal pollution index (MPI) values of 0.26, 0.25, and 0.24, respectively. The minimum values were observed in the gallbladder, muscle, brain, and swim bladder, with MPI values of 0.03, 0.06, 0.07, and 0.09, respectively. Average metal concentrations in the fish muscle were below the maximum allowed concentrations for human consumption. The mean As, Cd, Pb, Cu, Fe, and Zn concentrations in the muscle were 0.028, 0.001, 0.001, 0.192, 3.966, and 3.969 μg/g wet weight, respectively. We believe that the presented findings could be of interest for the scientific community and freshwater ecosystem managers. There is a need for further research that would assess less studied tissues in different fish species.

Keywords

Metal Trace element Danube Fish Wels catfish ICP-MS 

Supplementary material

11356_2014_3636_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (121 kb)
ESM 1(PDF 120 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katarina Jovičić
    • 1
  • Dragica M. Nikolić
    • 2
  • Željka Višnjić-Jeftić
    • 1
  • Vesna Đikanović
    • 3
  • Stefan Skorić
    • 1
  • Srđan M. Stefanović
    • 2
  • Mirjana Lenhardt
    • 3
  • Aleksandar Hegediš
    • 1
    • 4
  • Jasmina Krpo-Ćetković
    • 4
  • Ivan Jarić
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Multidisciplinary ResearchUniversity of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia
  2. 2.Institute of Meat Hygiene and TechnologyBelgradeSerbia
  3. 3.Institute for Biological Research “Siniša Stanković”University of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia
  4. 4.Faculty of BiologyUniversity of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia

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