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Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 19, Issue 9, pp 4234–4241 | Cite as

Response to F. Bochud and T. Jung: Comment on the human sex odds at birth after the atmospheric atomic bomb tests, after Chernobyl, and in the vicinity of nuclear facilities, Hagen Scherb & Kristina Voigt, Environ Sci Pollut Res (2011) 18:697–707 (DOI: 10.1007/s11356-012-0767-6)

  • Hagen Scherb
  • Kristina Voigt
Letter to the Editor

Introduction

Throughout the Letter To The Editor by F. Bochud and T. Jung ( 2012) concerning our article “ The human sex odds at birth after the atmospheric atomic bomb tests, after Chernobyl, and in the vicinity of nuclear facilities” (Scherb and Voigt 2011), the following peculiarity is obvious: F. Bochud and T. Jung ignore elementary statistical issues as well as basic data concerning the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation on human health including the human secondary sex odds. Within this background we want to clarify some of the major errors and deficiencies contained in the Letter by Bochud and Jung ( 2012), mainly in order to further explain our initial findings to the readers of ESPR. As the Bochud and Jung Letter ( 2012) is not formally structured, we respond to it according to the following topics:
  • Sex odds after the atomic bomb tests and after Chernobyl

  • Sex odds and Chernobyl: Italy, Yugoslavia, and Russia

  • Sex odds in the vicinity of German and Swiss running nuclear...

Keywords

Down Syndrome Chernobyl Accident Nuclear Facility Radiological Event Upward Jump 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to two reviewers for valuable suggestions. We are especially grateful to Professors Francois Bochud and Thomas Jung for raising issues, which gave us the opportunity to clarify our previously published findings as well as to corroborate them by further observations and straightforward statistical analyses.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Biomathematics and BiometryHelmholtz Zentrum Muenchen—German Research Center for Environmental HealthNeuherbergGermany

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