Environmental Science and Pollution Research

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 1119–1130

A source classification framework supporting pollutant source mapping, pollutant release prediction, transport and load forecasting, and source control planning for urban environments

  • Hans-Christian Holten Lützhøft
  • Erica Donner
  • Tonie Wickman
  • Eva Eriksson
  • Primož Banovec
  • Peter Steen Mikkelsen
  • Anna Ledin
Research Article

Abstract

Purpose

Implementation of current European environmental legislation such as the Water Framework Directive requires access to comprehensive, well-structured pollutant source and release inventories. The aim of this work was to develop a Source Classification Framework (SCF) ideally suited for this purpose.

Methods

Existing source classification systems were examined by a multidisciplinary research team, and an optimised SCF was developed. The performance and usability of the SCF were tested using a selection of 25 chemicals listed as priority pollutants in Europe.

Results

The SCF is structured in the form of a relational database and incorporates both qualitative and quantitative source classification and release data. The system supports a wide range of pollution monitoring and management applications. The SCF functioned well in the performance test, which also revealed important gaps in priority pollutant release data.

Conclusions

The SCF provides a well-structured approach for European pollutant source and release classification and management. With further optimisation and demonstration testing, the SCF has the potential to be fully implemented throughout Europe.

Keywords

Priority substances Source classification Stormwater Urban pollution Wastewater Water Framework Directive 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans-Christian Holten Lützhøft
    • 1
  • Erica Donner
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tonie Wickman
    • 4
  • Eva Eriksson
    • 1
  • Primož Banovec
    • 5
  • Peter Steen Mikkelsen
    • 1
  • Anna Ledin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental EngineeringTechnical University of DenmarkKgs. LyngbyDenmark
  2. 2.Urban Pollution Research CentreMiddlesex UniversityLondonUK
  3. 3.Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR)University of South AustraliaMawson LakesAustralia
  4. 4.City of Stockholm, Environment and Health AdministrationStockholmSweden
  5. 5.Faculty of Civil and Geodetic EngineeringUniversity of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia

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