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Effects of ski resort management on vegetation

  • Hitomi Kubota
  • Koji ShimanoEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

We investigated species composition and characteristics of plant communities in plots at seven site types within a ski resort: forests, an abandoned ski slope, an area under the gondola lines, forest waterfronts, open waterfronts, edges of ski slopes, and an active ski slope. On the abandoned ski slope, under the gondola lines, at the edges of ski slopes, and on the ski slope, canopy closure was low, tall herbs were present, and species diversity was high. Some wetland species were present at waterfront plots. Differential species composition was caused by vegetation cutting, which was necessary to manage the ski resort. We found various plants, including herbs, some rarely seen because their habitats have decreased. Despite their negative effects, such as surface-soil erosion and magnification of plant size due to the use of ammonium sulfate, ski resorts can be important plant habitats with highly diverse species composition.

Keywords

Ski slope Management Vegetation Refugia Habitat 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Mr. K. Takeuchi and Mr. T. Hatanaka of Shinshu University assisted greatly with our field survey. Fujimi Panorama Resort Company and its members also provided support. Dr. Akira Hiruma, a curator of Iida City Museum, offered helpful suggestions on constructing a synthetic table. We appreciate their help very much.

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Copyright information

© International Consortium of Landscape and Ecological Engineering and Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of ScienceShinshu UniversityMatsumotoJapan

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