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Sleep and Breathing

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 351–355 | Cite as

Consistency and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Mini-Sleep Questionnaire in undergraduate students

  • Asdrubal Falavigna
  • Márcio Luciano de Souza Bezerra
  • Alisson Roberto Teles
  • Fabrício Diniz Kleber
  • Maíra Cristina Velho
  • Roberta Castilhos da Silva
  • Thaís Mazzochin
  • Juliana Tosetto Santin
  • Gabriela Mosena
  • Gustavo Lisboa de Braga
  • Francine Lopes Petry
  • Miguel Francisco de Lessa Medina
Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

Questionnaires are indispensable tools in epidemiologic studies and clinical surveys. Many questionnaires focusing on sleep disorders have been described in the literature. This cross-sectional study is aimed to assess the consistency and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese Version of the Mini-Sleep Questionnaire (MSQ-BR).

Methods

Self-administered questionnaires were given to a sample of 1,108 undergraduate students. The variables collected were age, gender, socioeconomic level, and MSQ-BR scores. A subgroup of 53 students was randomly chosen to test the test–retest reliability of the instrument. Internal consistency of total MSQ-BR and its subscales (i.e., insomnia and hypersomnia) was evaluated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient.

Results

Our results showed good internal consistency of total MSQ-BR score, with a Cronbach’s alpha value of 0.770. The insomnia subscale had an adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha, 0.749). On the other hand, the hypersomnia subscale had moderate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha, 0.624). The test–retest analysis showed good reliability of the instrument using Pearson’s correlation coefficient.

Conclusions

The MSQ-BR has adequate internal consistency and test–retest reliability. The MSQ-BR insomnia has adequate internal consistency for use as a separate application. However, the MSQ-BR hypersomnia demonstrated only moderate internal consistency for use as a separate application. Our intention was not to introduce modifications to the questionnaire, but to evaluate the reliability of total MSQ-BR and its subscales. Others studies are needed to assess the consistency of MSQ compared to other instruments.

Keywords

Sleep Insomnia Hypersomnia Questionnaire 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge the undergraduate students of the Liga Acadêmica Multidisciplinar de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia da Universidade de Caxias do Sul: Maira Basso, Marcio F. Spagnól, Viviane M. Vedana e Luzia F. Lucena.

Conflict of interests

The authors declare no conflict of interests.

Financial support

The authors declare no financial support.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Asdrubal Falavigna
    • 1
  • Márcio Luciano de Souza Bezerra
    • 2
  • Alisson Roberto Teles
    • 3
  • Fabrício Diniz Kleber
    • 3
  • Maíra Cristina Velho
    • 3
  • Roberta Castilhos da Silva
    • 3
  • Thaís Mazzochin
    • 3
  • Juliana Tosetto Santin
    • 3
  • Gabriela Mosena
    • 3
  • Gustavo Lisboa de Braga
    • 3
  • Francine Lopes Petry
    • 3
  • Miguel Francisco de Lessa Medina
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Caxias do SulCaxias do SulBrazil
  2. 2.Riosono ClinicRio de JaneiroBrazil
  3. 3.University of Caxias do SulCaxias do SulBrazil

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